Recent in Biology (page 6 of 9)

Estée Lauder Study Shows Link Between Sleep, Skin Health

Of the results, the study's primary investigator said, "Our study is the first to conclusively demonstrate that inadequate sleep is correlated with reduced skin health and accelerates skin aging. Sleep deprived women show signs of premature skin aging and a decrease in their skin’s ability to recover after sun exposure."

The arNOX Enzyme: Implications for Intrinsic Aging

This article describes a membrane-bound enzyme found in skin whose activity increases as biological age increases. The enzyme, located on the external surface of fibroblasts and keratinocytes, generates free radicals. The present work identifies the biological mechanism of the enzyme and its relationship to the appearance of aging in skin.

Researchers Add Nanoneedle to AFM Probe for Greater Corneocyte Detail

Researchers from the University of Bath has constructed a "nanoneedle" at the end of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe to study the stratum corneum (SC) in detail, which may lead to better skin treatments and a greater understanding of skin aging.

Mitochondrial Nourishment and Protection for Antiaging Effects

Multiple factors affect the integrity of cell mitochondria, leading to loss of cell function, aging and apoptosis. In skin, this is expressed in the form of wrinkles, loss of tone, etc. To combat these effects, the author describes a technology that contains mitochondria-nourishing compounds to deliver antiaging benefits.

Determining the Keratolytic Activities of Benzoyl Peroxide, Retinoic Acid and Salicylic Acid In vivo

Keratolysis is the separation or loosening of the stratum corneum (SC), and is part of the natural cycle of skin renewal and regeneration. Disordered keratolysis, resulting in skin overgrowth or excessive desquamation, is responsible for various skin disorders.

Cell Signaling in Psoriasis for Ingredient Evaluation and Product Design

In this paper, the authors focus on the dialogue between skin epithelial cells and immune cells in the context of an inflammatory situation, i.e., psoriasis. The aim is to design in vitro models relevant to in vivo skin inflammation that can then be used to screen and evaluate potential cosmetic products.

Baby Skin vs. Adult Skin Structure, Function and Composition

Research shows that baby skin is different than adult skin in terms of structure, biochemical composition and function, as the authors review here. The adaptation of these skin qualities continues during the first year of life and should be considered when designing baby skin care products.

Glycation and Skin Aging: A Review

The present article, adapted from Draelos and Pugliese*, provides a review of the chemistry involved in the glycation process to assist formulators in developing topical or nutricosmetic solutions for mature skin care.

pH Buffering Considerations in Mature Skin*

This paper briefly reviews the basic science of pH and buffering capacity and the deleterious effects of increased pH in mature skin. In more detail, the authors consider which components of the stratum corneum (SC) are likely responsible for buffering capacity in skin of all ages, and discuss physiologic changes in the SC that may contribute to the decreased buffering capacity detected in mature skin.

Aquaporins: The One-Molecule-at-a-Time Moisturizer

This column describes aquaporins and outlines their 16-year history, with particular interest in an aquaglycero-porin found in human skin. Future columns will highlight the activities of several cosmetic manufacturers and their compositions to “stimulate” that aquaporin as a way to beautify human skin and hair.

Aquaporins: Stimulating AQP3

The current column will look at the separate but parallel paths followed by a major personal care manufacturer and a principal academic researcher in their attempts to understand what it means to stimulate aquaporin-3 (AQP3), the water channel protein in human skin.

Therapeutic Activity of Probiotics

Editor’s note: C&T magazine’s regular Bench & Beyond columnist Bud Brewster welcomes guest contributor and consultant Donald S. Orth to this month’s space.