Recent in Biology (page 14 of 27)

Researchers Disprove Resistance With Antibacterial Soap Use

A collaboration of researchers have reported that use of antibacterial soaps does not lead to antibiotic or antibacterial resistance.

Defining Clinically Relevant Fragrance Allergens: The Challenge (Part I)

Contact allergic dermatitis is a common, and some say pervasive public health problem. The degree to which fragrances and fragranced products contribute to this issue is investigated in a two-part overview by Howard Maibach, MD, and Jurij Hostýnek, PhD, from which the following is excerpted.

Comparatively Speaking: Keratinocyte vs. Corneocyte

Here, industry expert Tony O'Lenick asks Kelly Dobos to explain the difference between keratinocytes and corneocytes. Many skin care products target either keratinocytes or corneocytes; therefore, understanding their differences and the basic structure of human skin is important for formulators.

Study Discovers Mechanism Behind Caffeine's Inhibition of UV-induced Cancer

Researchers at Rutgers have suggested that topical caffeine may help lower the risk of UV-induced skin cancer.

Effects of Occlusion: Irritant and Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Occlusion bears both positive and negative effects on the health and integrity of skin. In the following excerpt, Hongbo Zhai, MD, and Howard Maibach, MD, introduce a discussion of the effects of occlusion on skin.

Researchers Find Cavity-causing Bacteria in Infants

Researchers at the University of Illinois have confirmed the presence of bacteria associated with early childhood caries (ECC) in infant saliva. The research, which was published in PLoS One in the article “Comparative analysis of salivary bacterial microbiome diversity in edentulous infants and their mothers or primary care givers using pyrosequencing” proposes the need for infant oral care.

Keratinization: An Overview

Following is an excerpt adapted from Physiology of the Skin, Third Edition, which explores the process of keratinization.

Determining the Keratoltic Activities of Benzoyl Peroxide, Retinoic Acid and Salicylic Acid In vivo

Keratolysis is the separation or loosening of the stratum corneum (SC), and is part of the natural cycle of skin renewal and regeneration. Disordered keratolysis, resulting in skin overgrowth or excessive desquamation, is responsible for various skin disorders.

Researchers Identify Hair Pigmentation Pathway

Researchers at New York University's Langone Medical Center have identified the communication pathway between hair follicles and melanocyte stem cells that regenerates pigmented hair.

Glycation and Skin Aging: A Review

The present article, adapted from Draelos and Pugliese*, provides a review of the chemistry involved in the glycation process to assist formulators in developing topical or nutricosmetic solutions for mature skin care.

pH Buffering Considerations in Mature Skin

This paper briefly reviews the basic science of pH and buffering capacity and the deleterious effects of increased pH in mature skin. In more detail, the authors consider which components of the stratum corneum (SC) are likely responsible for buffering capacity in skin of all ages, and discuss physiologic changes in the SC that may contribute to the decreased buffering capacity detected in mature skin.

Researchers Observe Hair Follicle Communication for Hair Growth

Researchers at the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine have discovered that stem cells in hair follicles communicate with each other via a specific molecular activator/inhibitor pair to stimulate hair growth.

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