Recent in Updates by Region (page 8 of 11)

Regulatory Review—Labeling Alcohol, Alcohol Denat. and Booze

Alcohol is a complex regulatory issue that confuses many chemists and marketers, as well as regulatory experts, as to the permitted grades, required uses and proper labeling—which vary by country. This confusion can lead to use of the wrong denaturants and levels, custom holds on imports and exports, and consumer misuse. The regulation of alcohol rarely changes but these problems remain.

The Consequences of Poor Regulations

The U.S. government is not alone in passing legislation that can and sometimes does lead to disasters, even if it has been warned about the consequences of its actions. The EU announced on March 11, 2013, that it has banned the sale of cosmetics containing ingredients that have been tested on animals.

The Consequences of Poor Regulations

The U.S. government is not alone in passing legislation that can and sometimes does lead to disasters, even if it has been warned about the consequences of its actions. The EU announced on March 11, 2013, that it has banned the sale of cosmetics containing ingredients that have been tested on animals.

The Impact of Junk Science on R&D: A Review of the 'Dirty Dozen'

Last spring, the David Suzuki Foundation, an environment conservation group based in Vancouver, published a report online describing what it called the “dirty dozen” cosmetic ingredients consumers should avoid. The group went so far as to provide a downloadable pocket guide of the 12 ingredients for consumers to use when they shop to avoid purchasing products containing these ingredients.

EU Regulation No. 1223/2009 Part 2: Prohibited Ingredients, Definitions and More

In total, EC No. 1223/2009, often called the Recast or the 8th Amendment, is comprised of a preamble with 71 parts (justification), 40 articles (replacing the old 15) and 10 annexes (replacing the old nine).

Cosmetic Ingredient and Regulatory Update: The Ugly, the Good and the Bad

This review takes a look at updates to ingredient regulations as of the first quarter in 2012. While “the ugly” refers to the EU Chemical Agency’s (ECHA’s) release of the first ingredients to be evaluated under REACH, the good news relates to the battle in Canada to save D5. “The bad” are the state of California’s addition of three ingredients to the Proposition 65 list, as well as Health Canada’s caution against labeling using generic terms.

EU Regulation No. 1223/2009 Part 1: Product Safety

The European Union (EU) has published the long-awaited Regulation No. 1223/2009 on Dec. 22, 2009. At 151 pages, it is a lengthy read and when it goes into effect on July 11, 2013, it will make the EU the most highly regulated cosmetics industry in the world.

From California to Colorado: Three Battles Against Cosmetics

In 2004, State Assemblyperson Judy Chu (D–Monterey Park, CA) fired the first bullets at the cosmetics industry by introducing a bill in California to ban certain ingredients from all cosmetics sold in the state.

PASS Coalition and Congressman Sam Farr Press FDA for UV Filter Approval

The PASS Coalition expresses its gratitude to subcommittee ranking member Sam Farr (D-CA) for pressing the FDA about the approval of pending sunscreen ingredients but notes that some UV filters have been pending with the FDA for over a decade.

PASS Coalition and Congressman Sam Farr Press FDA for UV Filter Approval

The PASS Coalition expresses its gratitude to subcommittee ranking member Sam Farr (D-CA) for pressing the FDA about the approval of pending sunscreen ingredients but notes that some UV filters have been pending with the FDA for over a decade.

Cosmetic Control Unit in Singapore

In 2008, Health Sciences Authority (HSA) established the ASEAN Cosmetic Directive (ACD) for cosmetic products in Singapore. This is enforced as the Heath Products Act, a subsidiary legislation of the HSA’s Health Products Regulation 2007. HSA created the Cosmetic Control Unit of Singapore to regulate cosmetics.

Canadian Regulatory Update

Discussion of regulatory changes, beginning with the most urgent. In addition, highlights comments published by Health Canada, in conjunction with Advertising Standards Canada, on acceptable and unacceptable cosmetic claims.

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