Labeling for Legitimacy: Certifications for Natural and Organic Personal Care

Aug 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Darrin C. Duber-Smith, Green Marketing Inc.
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Labeling for Legitimacy: Certifications for Natural and Organic Personal Care
USDAx organicx NOPx naturalx COSMOS standardsx Ecocertx
  • Article
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: USDA | organic | NOP | natural | COSMOS standards | Ecocert

Abstract: Standards for organic or natural products are largely the same, although some pertain to “natural” while others do “organic.” Each program and seal is intended for a given region, which should be taken into account when targeting specified markets. Here, the author reviews the most recognized natural and organic certifiers and seals around the globe.

View citation for this article

DC Duber-Smith, Labeling for Legitimacy: Certifications for Natural and Organic Personal Care, Cosm & Toil 128(8) 522 (2013)

Market Data

  • Global demand for organic personal care was more than $7.6 billion in 2012, and is expected to reach $13.2 billion by 2018.
  • The global organic market has grown due to increasing consumer concerns regarding personal health and hygiene.
  • Widening distribution channels and new product development have contributed to growth.
view full article

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Packaging. Marketers know from a host of consumer studies that the first time most consumers become acquainted with products is at the point-of-purchase, which still primarily occurs in a brick-and-mortar store. Not only that, but also the majority of purchase decisions—despite the consumer’s previous exposure to advertisements and other forms of promotion—are made at the point-of-purchase, sometimes rather spontaneously. All of this means that labeling and packaging decisions should be of paramount importance to product developers. Therefore, the decisions involved are not just about what is put into a product, but what goes on the product package—and to this latter point, the rules pertaining to desired claims.

For example, as is generally known in the United States, regulations surrounding most labeling decisions are under the purview of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). There are labeling requirements for both categories of topical products, i.e., cosmetics and drugs, as well as certain claims that are allowed and disallowed depending on the product category—a rule that seems randomly enforced. By now, this area should be well-understood by marketers, although it is often abused as too many cosmetics companies continue to make claims that are not allowed, such as “reduces wrinkles” or “reverses aging.” These drug claims are monitored by the FDA, although it has the resources to address only the most egregious of offenders.

In relation, the industry has been waiting patiently for the government to create a “cosmeceuticals” category for topical products, just as the Act of Congress (DSHEA 1994) created the intermediate “nutritional supplements” category between “food” and “drugs,” which is now almost 20 years old. Indeed, certain statements of “nutritional support” are allowed when a product is classified as a dietary supplement rather than a food or drug, but these statements cannot be “health” claims, which are only allowed for products classified as drugs.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This is an excerpt of an article from GCI Magazine. The full version can be found here.