Net Contents of a Cosmetic: The ‘E’ Mark and Units of Measure

Dec 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: David C. Steinberg, Steinberg & Associates
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Title: Net Contents of a Cosmetic: The ‘E’ Mark and Units of Measure
The Estimated Symbolx Claimsx Labelingx Units of Measurex
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Keywords: The Estimated Symbol | Claims | Labeling | Units of Measure

Abstract: Recently, some European Union member states have expressed concern over the misuse of the Estimated Symbol (℮), often referred to as the “e” mark, on product labels. In addition, some regulators have argued that the International System of Units, known as the metric system, should be used on all product labels to indicate the net contents of a finished product. Both of these concerns have fueled the present column in which the author debates how product labels should indicate the net contents of a cosmetic product. In closing, he comments on the jurisdiction of the CPSC in the United States.

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Recently, some European Union member states have expressed concern over the misuse of the Estimated Symbol (℮), often referred to as the “e” mark, on product labels. In addition, some regulators have argued that the International System of Units, known as the metric system, should be used on all product labels to indicate the net contents of a finished product. Both of these concerns have fueled the present column in which the author debates how product labels should indicate the net contents of a cosmetic product. In closing, he comments on the jurisdiction of the CPSC in the United States.

Net Content Regulations in the United States 
In the United States, the net contents of a product are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA), which was passed by Congress in 1967. Under 21CFR701.13, the FDA requires net contents to appear on the lower 30% of the principal display panel (PDP), which is what consumers see first, or the outer packaging. The regulation states:

This shall be expressed in terms of weight, measure, numerical count, or a combination of numerical count and weight or measure. The statement shall be in terms of fluid measure if the cosmetic is liquid or in terms of weight if the cosmetic is solid, semisolid, or viscous, or a mixture of solid and liquid. If there is a firmly established, general consumer usage and trade custom of declaring the net quantity of a cosmetic by numerical count, linear measure, or measure of area, such respective term may be used. If there is a firmly established, general consumer usage and trade custom of declaring the contents of a liquid cosmetic by weight, or a solid, semisolid, or viscous cosmetic by fluid measure, it may be used.1

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Table 1. Type Size Restrictions

Table 1. Type size restrictions

Table 1 shows these restrictions in metric terms.

Table 2. Correct bilingual abbreviations

Table 2. Correct bilingual abbreviations

The correct bilingual abbreviations are listed in Table 2.

Figure 1. The Estimated Symbol

Figure 1. The Estimated Symbol

While some refer to this symbol as the “e” mark, it is not an “e”—the correct name is the Estimated Symbol, which is shown in Figure 1.

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