Claims/Labeling

Recent in Claims/Labeling (page 3 of 7)

Walmart U.S., Sam's Club Set Full Ingredient Disclosure Goals

The plan includes full disclosure of all ingredients including those typically protected under trade secrets such as fragrances.

The Steinberg Administration’s Final Take on Cosmetic Regulations

Cosmetics & Toiletries bids a fond farewell to David C. Steinberg in this, his final “Regulatory Review” column. Here, he describes how he would regulate cosmetics, after having followed and reported on them for more than 18 years.

Cosmetic Safety: Public Perception and Scientific Reality

As far as the public is concerned, hypothetical risks are real. And if anyone studies a chemical in depth, they can find some effect but whether it should be removed from the market comes down to a risk-benefit analysis. Cosmetic formulation is a continuous process of keeping in step with research, and when a true risk emerges, addressing it.

Cosmetic Safety: Public Perception and Scientific Reality

As far as the public is concerned, hypothetical risks are real. And if anyone studies a chemical in depth, they can find some effect but whether it should be removed from the market comes down to a risk-benefit analysis. Cosmetic formulation is a continuous process of keeping in step with research, and when a true risk emerges, addressing it.

Six Common Criteria for Cosmetic Claims in the EU

In European Cosmetics Regulation No. 1223/2009, the European Commission (EC) has chosen to regulate cosmetic claims in addition to the existing regimes, saying that consumers should be protected from misleading claims concerning efficacy and other characteristics of cosmetic products.

Six Common Criteria for Cosmetic Claims in the EU

In European Cosmetics Regulation No. 1223/2009, the European Commission (EC) has chosen to regulate cosmetic claims in addition to the existing regimes, saying that consumers should be protected from misleading claims concerning efficacy and other characteristics of cosmetic products.

Scientists Find Warning Labels May Not Scare Consumers Away

Scientists at INSEAD in Singapore, Tel Aviv University and New York University have found that rather than scaring consumers away, warnings on drug labels can improve consumers’ opinions and increase product sales when there is a delay between seeing the ad and deciding to buy or consume the product.

'May Contain' Ingredient Disclosures

The US Code of Federal Regulations lists1 the rules for displaying ingredients, and besides outlining the content that must be included and its order of appearance, the regulation describes use of the “may contain” clause, which while legally only applies to pigments, has been abused and is thus the main topic of this column.

Net Contents of a Cosmetic: The ‘E’ Mark and Units of Measure

Recently, some European Union member states have expressed concern over the misuse of the Estimated Symbol (℮), often referred to as the “e” mark, on product labels. In addition, some regulators have argued that the International System of Units, known as the metric system, should be used on all product labels to indicate the net contents of a finished product. Both of these concerns have fueled the present column in which the author debates how product labels should indicate the net contents of a cosmetic product. In closing, he comments on the jurisdiction of the CPSC in the United States.

Labeling Claims

Little is more confusing to marketers and cosmetic formulators than product claims regulations. Questions regarding the rules commonly arise.

Recent Changes in US Regulations

Two recent changes to regulations will significantly impact the industry in 2009. These include changes to over-the-counter (OTC) labels, and the latest amendment to the Lacey Act.

The EU Fragrance Allergens

On March 11, 2003, the European Union (EU) published the 7th Amendment to its Cosmetic Directive 76/768/EEC. Among the changes was the addition of the 26 popular fragrance ingredients to the Annex III “List of Substances Which Cosmetic Products Must Not Contain Except Subject to the Restrictions Laid Down.” These are now commonly referred to as the EU Fragrance Allergens.

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