Recent in Claims/Labeling (page 3 of 7)

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'May Contain' Ingredient Disclosures

The US Code of Federal Regulations lists1 the rules for displaying ingredients, and besides outlining the content that must be included and its order of appearance, the regulation describes use of the “may contain” clause, which while legally only applies to pigments, has been abused and is thus the main topic of this column.

Net Contents of a Cosmetic: The ‘E’ Mark and Units of Measure

Recently, some European Union member states have expressed concern over the misuse of the Estimated Symbol (℮), often referred to as the “e” mark, on product labels. In addition, some regulators have argued that the International System of Units, known as the metric system, should be used on all product labels to indicate the net contents of a finished product. Both of these concerns have fueled the present column in which the author debates how product labels should indicate the net contents of a cosmetic product. In closing, he comments on the jurisdiction of the CPSC in the United States.

Labeling Claims

Little is more confusing to marketers and cosmetic formulators than product claims regulations. Questions regarding the rules commonly arise.

Recent Changes in US Regulations

Two recent changes to regulations will significantly impact the industry in 2009. These include changes to over-the-counter (OTC) labels, and the latest amendment to the Lacey Act.

The EU Fragrance Allergens

On March 11, 2003, the European Union (EU) published the 7th Amendment to its Cosmetic Directive 76/768/EEC. Among the changes was the addition of the 26 popular fragrance ingredients to the Annex III “List of Substances Which Cosmetic Products Must Not Contain Except Subject to the Restrictions Laid Down.” These are now commonly referred to as the EU Fragrance Allergens.

Certifying Hair Product Claims

Claims for hair products generally are not associated with clear cut outcomes. Therefore, consumers have no standard by which to compare product efficacy. In relation, the North American Hair Research Society (NAHRS) has proposed standards for hair product claims, outlined here, which relate to characteristics including frizz, color fastness and curl retention, among others.

Translating Data into Claims and Interpreting Regulations: Science vs. Marketing

Substantial evidence, which the FDA requires to support claims for drugs, is applicable to personal care, especially considering the pharmaceutical direction products have taken. The present article considers whether the industry is benefiting from marketing without assuming the responsibility for potential effects. In addition, it considers the limitations of in vitro and in vivo test models.

C&T's Regulatory Webinar Garners Great Response

On Nov. 28, 2012, Cosmetics & Toiletries hosted a live Webinar titled, "Regulations—What You Forgot to Ask," featuring a call-in with industry regulatory expert David Steinberg.

L'Oréal Receives A Warning Letter From the FDA for Drug Claims

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning letter to L'Oréal for gene, stem cell and skin regeneration claims associated with Lancôme products.

The EU Fragrance Allergens

On March 11, 2003, the European Union (EU) published the 7th Amendment to its Cosmetic Directive 76/768/EEC. Among the changes was the addition of the 26 popular fragrance ingredients to the Annex III “List of Substances Which Cosmetic Products Must Not Contain Except Subject to the Restrictions Laid Down.” These are now commonly referred to as the EU Fragrance Allergens.

Researchers Suggest Gluten Identification in Cosmetics

Research presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s (ACG) 76th Annual Scientific meeting in Washington, D.C., USA, suggested that celiac patients may have adverse reactions to gluten in cosmetics.

NSF/ANSI 305 Expands to Include EU Organic Ingredients

NSF International’s American National Standard for Personal Care Products Containing Organic Ingredients (NSF/ANSI 305) has been expanded to allow plant-based ingredients that are certified to European Union (EU) organic regulations.

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