Recent in Regulatory (page 18 of 22)

Net Contents of a Cosmetic: The ‘E’ Mark and Units of Measure

Recently, some European Union member states have expressed concern over the misuse of the Estimated Symbol (℮), often referred to as the “e” mark, on product labels. In addition, some regulators have argued that the International System of Units, known as the metric system, should be used on all product labels to indicate the net contents of a finished product. Both of these concerns have fueled the present column in which the author debates how product labels should indicate the net contents of a cosmetic product. In closing, he comments on the jurisdiction of the CPSC in the United States.

Cosmetics Registration in California and the FDA's Electronic-only Drug Registration

The stars where poorly aligned on June 15, 2009, when California finally issued its registration procedure and forms for the California Safe Cosmetics Act of 2005. At the same time, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) moved to an electronic-only filing system for drug registrations. These two changes have created significantly more work for the personal care industry—and with questionable benefits.

Labeling Claims

Little is more confusing to marketers and cosmetic formulators than product claims regulations. Questions regarding the rules commonly arise.

Recent ATPs and Their Effect in the EU and Abroad

The recast of the directive, known as the 8th Amendment, has been proposed. This amendment currently is in review by the European Parliament and Council of Ministers. If an agreement is reached, the personal care industry will see many sweeping changes, as reported in the June 2008 edition of this column.

Organic and Natural: Caveat Emptor

Previous columns have discussed Canadian Natural Health Products regulations but have steered clear of the natural and organic debate, although this author previously published an article that debates animal versus vegetable ingredients, in which he explains that a chemical is a chemical regardless of its origin; a molecule of glycerin is just that, whether from natural sources like animal or vegetable fat, or from petroleum or biodiesel sources.

Recent Changes in US Regulations

Two recent changes to regulations will significantly impact the industry in 2009. These include changes to over-the-counter (OTC) labels, and the latest amendment to the Lacey Act.

Cosmetic Ingredients on the EU’s Dangerous Substances List

The Cosmetics Directive 76/768/EEC was recast as Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009 on Nov. 30, 2009, and this recast will totally repeal the original legislation on July 11, 2013. While the recast still contains a Dangerous Substances List, elements of the list have changed. This column distills some 1,355 pages of regulation down to review the cosmetic ingredients listed.

Regulatory Review—Labeling Alcohol, Alcohol Denat. and Booze

Alcohol is a complex regulatory issue that confuses many chemists and marketers, as well as regulatory experts, as to the permitted grades, required uses and proper labeling—which vary by country. This confusion can lead to use of the wrong denaturants and levels, custom holds on imports and exports, and consumer misuse. The regulation of alcohol rarely changes but these problems remain.

The Consequences of Poor Regulations

The U.S. government is not alone in passing legislation that can and sometimes does lead to disasters, even if it has been warned about the consequences of its actions. The EU announced on March 11, 2013, that it has banned the sale of cosmetics containing ingredients that have been tested on animals.

The Consequences of Poor Regulations

The U.S. government is not alone in passing legislation that can and sometimes does lead to disasters, even if it has been warned about the consequences of its actions. The EU announced on March 11, 2013, that it has banned the sale of cosmetics containing ingredients that have been tested on animals.

The Impact of Junk Science on R&D: A Review of the 'Dirty Dozen'

Last spring, the David Suzuki Foundation, an environment conservation group based in Vancouver, published a report online describing what it called the “dirty dozen” cosmetic ingredients consumers should avoid. The group went so far as to provide a downloadable pocket guide of the 12 ingredients for consumers to use when they shop to avoid purchasing products containing these ingredients.

EU Regulation No. 1223/2009 Part 2: Prohibited Ingredients, Definitions and More

In total, EC No. 1223/2009, often called the Recast or the 8th Amendment, is comprised of a preamble with 71 parts (justification), 40 articles (replacing the old 15) and 10 annexes (replacing the old nine).

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