Recent in Regulatory (page 16 of 21)

Organic and Natural: Caveat Emptor

Previous columns have discussed Canadian Natural Health Products regulations but have steered clear of the natural and organic debate, although this author previously published an article that debates animal versus vegetable ingredients, in which he explains that a chemical is a chemical regardless of its origin; a molecule of glycerin is just that, whether from natural sources like animal or vegetable fat, or from petroleum or biodiesel sources.

Recent Changes in US Regulations

Two recent changes to regulations will significantly impact the industry in 2009. These include changes to over-the-counter (OTC) labels, and the latest amendment to the Lacey Act.

Cosmetic Ingredients on the EU’s Dangerous Substances List

The Cosmetics Directive 76/768/EEC was recast as Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009 on Nov. 30, 2009, and this recast will totally repeal the original legislation on July 11, 2013. While the recast still contains a Dangerous Substances List, elements of the list have changed. This column distills some 1,355 pages of regulation down to review the cosmetic ingredients listed.

Regulatory Review—Labeling Alcohol, Alcohol Denat. and Booze

Alcohol is a complex regulatory issue that confuses many chemists and marketers, as well as regulatory experts, as to the permitted grades, required uses and proper labeling—which vary by country. This confusion can lead to use of the wrong denaturants and levels, custom holds on imports and exports, and consumer misuse. The regulation of alcohol rarely changes but these problems remain.

The Consequences of Poor Regulations

The U.S. government is not alone in passing legislation that can and sometimes does lead to disasters, even if it has been warned about the consequences of its actions. The EU announced on March 11, 2013, that it has banned the sale of cosmetics containing ingredients that have been tested on animals.

The Consequences of Poor Regulations

The U.S. government is not alone in passing legislation that can and sometimes does lead to disasters, even if it has been warned about the consequences of its actions. The EU announced on March 11, 2013, that it has banned the sale of cosmetics containing ingredients that have been tested on animals.

The Impact of Junk Science on R&D: A Review of the 'Dirty Dozen'

Last spring, the David Suzuki Foundation, an environment conservation group based in Vancouver, published a report online describing what it called the “dirty dozen” cosmetic ingredients consumers should avoid. The group went so far as to provide a downloadable pocket guide of the 12 ingredients for consumers to use when they shop to avoid purchasing products containing these ingredients.

EU Regulation No. 1223/2009 Part 2: Prohibited Ingredients, Definitions and More

In total, EC No. 1223/2009, often called the Recast or the 8th Amendment, is comprised of a preamble with 71 parts (justification), 40 articles (replacing the old 15) and 10 annexes (replacing the old nine).

The EU Fragrance Allergens

On March 11, 2003, the European Union (EU) published the 7th Amendment to its Cosmetic Directive 76/768/EEC. Among the changes was the addition of the 26 popular fragrance ingredients to the Annex III “List of Substances Which Cosmetic Products Must Not Contain Except Subject to the Restrictions Laid Down.” These are now commonly referred to as the EU Fragrance Allergens.

Cosmetic Ingredient and Regulatory Update: The Ugly, the Good and the Bad

This review takes a look at updates to ingredient regulations as of the first quarter in 2012. While “the ugly” refers to the EU Chemical Agency’s (ECHA’s) release of the first ingredients to be evaluated under REACH, the good news relates to the battle in Canada to save D5. “The bad” are the state of California’s addition of three ingredients to the Proposition 65 list, as well as Health Canada’s caution against labeling using generic terms.

EU Regulation No. 1223/2009 Part 1: Product Safety

The European Union (EU) has published the long-awaited Regulation No. 1223/2009 on Dec. 22, 2009. At 151 pages, it is a lengthy read and when it goes into effect on July 11, 2013, it will make the EU the most highly regulated cosmetics industry in the world.

From California to Colorado: Three Battles Against Cosmetics

In 2004, State Assemblyperson Judy Chu (D–Monterey Park, CA) fired the first bullets at the cosmetics industry by introducing a bill in California to ban certain ingredients from all cosmetics sold in the state.

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