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Sun Care is the Next Beauty Growth Engine

July 18, 2016 | Contact Author | By: Jeb Gleason-Allured
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Sales of skin care touting SPF 40-50 grew by more than $36 million, according to NPD.

Abstract: A new NPD analysis shows that higher SPF makeup and skin care offer brands an opportunity to provide consumers with correction and care.

In a recent analysis of the booming US beauty market, Euromonitor's data showed low growth, just north of 2%, for the sun care category. But, according to a new report from NPD, consumers are seeking skin care and makeup with more intense sun protection.

The NPD Group has noted that sales of prestige skin care and makeup products with SPF protection reached $1.4 billion in the 12 months ending May 2016, expanding by 7% over the last two years.

“Sun care looks to be the next beauty growth area to emerge, as consumers move from a singular focus on correction to a broader focus on care."

While SPF 15 represents the largest SPF segment in skin care and makeup, its growth is beginning to give way to gains in levels of SPF 30 or higher. In fact, these higher SPF levels are growing at twice the rate of other levels.

Sales of skin care touting SPF 40-50 grew by more than $36 million, according to NPD. Makeup sales in the same range doubled sales during that time, totaling $14 million.The analysis found that the growth opportunity extends into facial moisturizers and foundation.

Meanwhile, sales of self tanners have returned to growth among consumers seeking UV-free glows, posting a 7% increase from June 2015-May 2016.

“Sun care looks to be the next beauty growth area to emerge, as consumers move from a singular focus on correction to a broader focus on care,” said Karen Grant, global beauty industry analyst, The NPD Group.

Grant added, “From what they eat to what they put on their bodies, consumers are becoming more focused and well-versed in health and wellness. Consumers today are more proactive and less reactive when it comes to managing their well-being. This attitude also translates to the beauty consumer, whose emphasis today weighs less on fixing an issue, and more on preventing one from happening in the first place. For more than a decade, all the news in skin care was about serums and technology, but today the focus has shifted to cleaner, simpler, and lighter products. The growth in products with higher SPF ties into today’s mindset and is connected to other emerging care formats including oil, water, milk and clay.”