All Things Skin: UV Damage, Claim Support, Nano-formulating and More

Mar 28, 2006 | Contact Author | By: Rachel Chapman
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Title: All Things Skin: UV Damage, Claim Support, Nano-formulating and More
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Cosmetic scientists, researchers and formulators will combine formulating forces to present answers and ideas to skin formulating challenges at next week’s Advanced Technology Conference (ATC), to be held April 3-4, 2006, in Barcelona . Skin care is global market expected to reach US$5.8 billion by 2008. These industry experts will provide the critical data and research necessary to help attendees impact and grow with this aggressive market.


Day one will open with a discussion of cryo-electron microscopy of native vitrous tissue sections by Lars Norlén ( Dermatology Clinic Karolinska Hospital). The described method explains how, for the first time, it is possible to study the ultra-structure of skin in its natural fully hydrated state, without chemical fixation or staining. According to Norlén, results have shown that micrographs of human skin obtained by cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous skin sections (CEMOVIS) not only show more detail, but also differ dramatically from those obtained by conventional methods. 

David C. Steinberg (Steinberg & Associates) will report on the ever-changing state of global regulations and its impact on formulators. New regulations and what they mean to formulators will be covered. Following Steinberg’s regulations, Werner Baschong (Ciba Specialty Chemicals Corp.) will investigate skin moisturization relative to UV damage. Key to barrier maintenance and repair is regular cosmetic care, explains Baschong, and the effect of moisturizers during and after application is documented in a comparative study, as is the psycho-sensory perception of day care formulations. Trans-barrier transport of actives into the viable skin, the distribution of actives in its different layers, and the localization of enzyme activation within the skin also are presented.

Re-inventing with silicones, Tony O’Lenick (Siltech LLC) will discuss how what is now considered new and fuels new product development is indeed a discovery about a new property of a known material. His presentation will look at dimethicone copolyol, alkyl dimethicone and alkyl dimethicone copolyol polymers, revealing some structure and function relationships to allow chemists to maximize their effectiveness in cosmetic products.

Presenting an alternative view of the epidermal barrier, Robert Lochhead ( University of S. Missippi , School of Polymers ) will review the conventional view of the stratum corneum as a bricks-and-mortar model, in which the bricks are desquamated corneocytes and the mortar consists of lamellar bodies and water soluble/swellable macromolecules. The lamellar bodies are observed as segregated globules in the lower layers and they fuse in the upper layers to form an extensive lamellar barrier. Attempting to understand the underlying mechanism of these phase changes is, according to Lochhead, a fascinating exercise in polymer/colloid science. In the described research, Lochhead explains how his work has developed simple models with the aim of understanding the molecular driving forces that are responsible for the observed micro-segregation and eventual fusing of the lamellae into contiguous structures.

Proctor & Gamble’s principal scientist, Russell Elliott, will help attendees face the challenges of handling nanoparticles in complex cosmetic systems. Nanoparticle sunscreen formulas, for example, have a high surface area that can cause them to deplete emulsifier/dispersant from other particles and/or the emulsion itself, causing instability. Elliott will explain an approach to prevent this effect using fibril coatings chemically bonded on the nanoparticles. Following Elliott, Luigi Rigano (Luigi Rigano Laboratories) will describe antioxidants and their role in preventing aging; modern strategies to adopt for limiting unwanted oxidation reactions in the skin will be discussed, focusing on new and recently available vegetal actives. 

Day one will close with Barbara Brockway’s (Optima Chemicals) discussion on advanced silicone-in-water combinations for skin care. New silicone-in-water emulsions and the latest hybrid silicone composite powders could deliver important product sensory characteristics. Brockway suggest how, used together, they improve feel and can be incorporated into highly volatile and mixed polar phases.

Leading into in-cosmetics, day two of ATC Barcelona will open with Alverio Malpede’s (Cosmetic Division, Prodotti Gianni) coverage of trends in cosmetic raw materials. According to Malpede, the overall trend is to launch new ingredients that blur the demarcation line between cosmetic and dermatological products while providing ingredients perceived as safe and natural. Theresa Callaghan (proDerm Institute for Applied Dermatological Research) will take a closer look at two consumer trends, the concerns for cellulite and aging, and investigates whether cellulite is an aging phenomenon. The role of hormones, lymph flux, vascularity, inflammation, adipose biochemistry, and stress-related aging effects on connective and adipose tissue, in the occurrence of cellulite, will be considered.

Another facet of aging will be given by Nalini Kaul, Ph.D. (Hill Top Research, Inc.). Consumers opposed to invasive and expensive procedures need easily accessible products with proven antiaging efficacy, according to Kaul. The antiaging concept includes the prevention of, reversal of, and restoration from the effects of aging. Antioxidants, botanicals, moisturizers and sunscreens are a part of the antiaging market and current clinical designs and sophisticated instrumentation methods used for claim support for these products will be presented.

Finally, Conference Chair Johann Wiechers, Ph.D. (Uniqema), discusses studies strongly suggesting the existence of a connection between the mind and the body and examines how to substantiate such “mind” claims.  

Registration for ATC Barcelona includes all conference presentations, the welcome reception, one breakfast, two networking luncheons, two morning breaks, one afternoon break, a proceedings book and a one-year free subscription to C&T’s digital edition. For more information, visit the show’s Web page at www.CosmeticsandToiletries.com/atc, contact blloyd@allured.com or call 1-630-653-2155 ext. 555.