Ingredient Profile: Decyl Glucoside

Aug 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Michael J. Fevola, PhD, Johnson & Johnson
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Ingredient Profile: Decyl Glucoside
decyl glycosidex cleansingx surfactantx foamingx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: decyl glycoside | cleansing | surfactant | foaming

Abstract: Alkyl polyglucoside (APG) surfactants continue to be a popular choice of formulators seeking to improve the sustainability of cleansing products for personal care, hard surface cleaning, dishwashing, laundry and industrial/institutional applications.

View citation for this article

M Fevola, Ingredient profile: Decyl glucoside, Cosm & Toil 127(8) 552-558 (Aug 2012)

Market Data

  • Peptides are spreading beyond their core facial care market; melanin-activating peptides (MAPs) are gaining momentum in self-tanning.
  • Self-tanning accounts for only 5% of the global sun care market.
  • Self-tanning is restricted to developed markets, with North America and Western Europe making up almost 80% of total sales.
view full article

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Alkyl polyglucoside (APG) surfactants continue to be a popular choice of formulators seeking to improve the sustainability of cleansing products for personal care, hard surface cleaning, dishwashing, laundry, and industrial/institutional applications. Made from 100% renewable starting materials and readily biodegradable in the environment, APGs are among the most commonly employed nonionic surfactants in so-called “green” cleansing products, and they routinely appear on the ingredient labels of personal cleansers marketed as “natural.”

In cosmetic applications, decyl polyglucoside (INCI: Decyl Glucoside), described here, is the most frequently used APG, for it delivers reasonably high foaming and cleansing performance for a nonionic surfactant without the irritation potential of anionic detergents, such as alkyl sulfates and alkyl ether sulfates.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

Close

Figure 1. Generalized chemical structure of decyl glucoside (DG)

Figure 1. Generalized chemical structure of decyl glucoside (DG)

Generalized chemical structure of decyl glucoside (DG), where DP = degree of polymerization and typically ranges from 1.4–1.8; wavy bonds represent either α- or β- linkages

Figure 2. Chemical structures for some representative mono- and diglucoside components found in DG

Figure 2. Chemical structures for some representative mono- and diglucoside components found in DG

Chemical structures for some of the specific mono- and diglucosides that may be found in DG are shown here; the alkyl tail group of DG has an average value of C10; however, the distribution normally includes alkyl chain lengths ranging from C8–C16.

Figure 3. Flow chart showing the two principle routes for commercial scale DG synthesis

Figure 3. Flow chart showing the two principle routes for commercial scale DG synthesis

Flow chart showing the two principle routes for commercial scale DG synthesis: the two-step transglycosidation route and the one-step direct glycosidation route, followed by post-reaction processing steps. Adapted from References 12 and 13.

Figure 4. Synthesis of DG starting from glucose via two-step transglycosidation

Figure 4. Synthesis of DG starting from glucose via two-step transglycosidation

BG may be obtained via butanolysis of starch or dextrose syrups, or via direct glycosidaton with glucose, as shown here.

Figure 5. Synthesis of DG starting from glucose via one-step direct glycosidation

Figure 5. Synthesis of DG starting from glucose via one-step direct glycosidation

Alternatively, glucose may be reacted directly with an excess of the C10FA in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce DG.

Biography: Michael J. Fevola, PhD, Johnson & Johnson

Michael J. Fevola, PhD, is a manager in the New Technologies group at Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide in Skillman, NJ, where he leads R&D in polymer and surface chemistry. Fevola has authored 12 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, is an inventor on six US patents, and is a member of the Personal Care Product Council’s International Nomenclature Committee and the Society of Cosmetic Chemists.

Next image >

 
 

Close

It's Free...

Register or Log in to get full access to this content

Registration includes:

  • Access to all premium content
  • One click ingredient sample requests
  • Save articles in the My Library tool

Create an Account or Log In