Sustainability: Trends in Polymers and Surfactants for Hair Care

Jan 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Michael J. Fevola, PhD, Johnson & Johnson; Camille Sasik, Aveda; Ramachandra Shastry, Arizona Chemical; and Robert Y. Lochhead, PhD, University of Southern Mississippi
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Title: Sustainability: Trends in Polymers and Surfactants for Hair Care
naturalx sustainablex polymersx surfactantsx self-healingx
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Keywords: natural | sustainable | polymers | surfactants | self-healing

Abstract: Market trends are driving the development of polymer and surfactant ingredients toward natural origins—in particular, plants. In this article, the authors review some of the recent trends in green surfactants and polymers for hair care. One interesting technology transfer trend is the use of hydrogen-bonded supramolecular networks to produce self-healing fixative films.

Market Data

  • Global demand for organic personal care was more than $7.6 billion in 2012, and is expected to reach $13.2 billion by 2018.
  • The global organic market has grown due to increasing consumer concerns regarding personal health and hygiene.
  • Widening distribution channels and new product development have contributed to growth.
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The present article considers some of the latest trends in sustainable surfactant and polymer technologies for hair care. It is not intended to be comprehensive but more of a look at a few bright spots in this emerging field.

Current Perspectives on Natural Surfactants

The growth of the sustainability and natural products megatrends has led to ever-increasing consumer appeal for greener products in the personal cleansing category.1, 2 Whether motivated by a sense of environmental and social responsibility or by the perception—sometimes false—that such products are safer and healthier, consumers are continuously seeking and preferentially purchasing so-called natural cleansing products. Accordingly, formulators must identify and employ functionally equivalent natural alternatives to the traditional surfactants used in cleansers, to provide aesthetically pleasing lather and detergency without irritation.

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This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 
 

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