Improving Skin Moisturization with Polyglycerol-derived Plant Waxes

Jan 1, 2010 | Contact Author | By: Paula Lennon, PhD, and Jean-David Rodier, Gattefossé SAS
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Title: Improving Skin Moisturization with Polyglycerol-derived Plant Waxes
moisturizationx waxesx sensory benefitsx TEWLx corneometryx microreliefx
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Keywords: moisturization | waxes | sensory benefits | TEWL | corneometry | microrelief

Abstract: While the claims used for skin care are becoming more and more varied, moisturization remains the priority. In this article, a method of improving the moisturization of cosmetics is described involving the use of a polyglycerol-derived blend of vegetable waxes to protect the skin from dehydration and to boost the moisturizing capacity of emulsions.

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P Lennon and J-D Rodier, Improving skin moisturization with polyglycerol-derived plant waxes, Cosm & Toil 125(1) 38-43 (Jan 2010)

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Moisturization remains the main objective of skin care cosmetics, coupled with secondary functions such as antiwrinkle, firming or brightening benefits. The moisturizing ability of a formulation generally is imparted by the use of polyols, mainly glycerin. Glycerin can help attract water from the formulation or the atmosphere and retain it in the epidermis. Added to an emulsion at levels between 3% and 10%, glycerin ensures a good level of hydration that is maintained for several hours; the duration of this effect depends on the other components in the formulation.

Many emollients, such as mineral oil and some silicones, act as occlusive agents and help to prevent the evaporation of water from the skin. Other emollients may not play an active role in hydration but instead help to maintain a soft and smooth feeling on the skin, giving the impression of better moisturization. In addition, a number of moisturizing actives act upon the lipidic cement of the horny layer, the glycoaminoglycans (GAGs), or the skin’s natural moisturizing factors (NMF). These tend to have longer-term effects since they act on the skin’s biological mechanisms. The hydration of the skin largely controls the consumer’s perception of comfort; i.e., tight, dry skin is often related to insufficient moisturization. To address skin moisturization with a natural solution, the present article describes an ingredient of natural origin that is capable of improving skin moisturization.

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Table 1. All-natural formulations used for described tests

Table 1. All-natural formulations used for described tests
All-natural formulations used for: sensorial analysis (A, B); panelist self-assessment (C, D); and corneometry/TEWL/microrelief testing (E, F), as described

Figure 1. Reaction of jojoba, mimosa and sunflower wax esters with polyglycerol-3

Figure 1. Reaction of jojoba, mimosa and sunflower wax esters with polyglycerol-3

Depiction of the reaction of jojoba, mimosa and sunflower wax esters with polyglycerol-3 to create polyglycerol-3 wax esters and new combined ester

Figure 2. Sensorial profile of creams A and B given in Table 1

Figure 2. Sensorial profile of creams A and B given in Table 1

Comparative sensorial profile of creams A and B given in Table 1, one containing lanolin and the other containing the polyglyceryl wax ester blend at 5%

Figure 3. Percentage variation of TEWL reduction

Figure 3. Percentage variation of TEWL reduction

Percentage variation of TEWL reduction (D28-D0) of a formulation containing either 5% lanolin (Table 1, F) or 5% polyglyceryl wax ester blend (Table 1, E), compared with an untreated area

Figure 4. Percentage variation of the moisturizing effect by corneometry

Figure 4. Percentage variation of the moisturizing effect by corneometry

Percentage variation (D28-D0) of the moisturizing effect as measured by corneometry of a formulation containing either 5% lanolin (Table 1, F) or 5% polyglyceryl wax ester blend (Table 1, E), compared with an untreated area

Figure 5. Evaluation of skin microrelief improvement

Figure 5. Evaluation of skin microrelief improvement

Evaluation of skin microrelief improvement between D0 and D28, evaluated by a dermatologist, comparison of a formulation containing either 5% lanolin (Table 1, F) or 5% polyglyceryl wax ester blend (Table 1, E)

Figure 6. Microscopy images of the skin microrelief after treatment

Figure 6. Microscopy images of the skin microrelief after treatment

Microscopy images of the skin microrelief after treatment with a formulation containing either lanolin (Table 1, F) or the polyglyceryl wax ester blend (Table 1, E); results shown are from volunteer No. 28

Figure 7. Self-assessment by a panel of 16

Figure 7. Self-assessment by a panel of 16

Self-assessment by a panel of 16 of the texture and efficacy of a formulation containing either 5% polyglyceryl wax ester blend (Table 1, C) or 5% lanolin (Table 1, D)

Footnotes [Lennon 125(1)]

a Hydracire S. (INCI: Acacia Decurrens (Mimosa)/Jojoba/Sunflower Seed Wax Polyglyceryl-3 Esters) is a product of Gattefossé.

b The Tewameter TM 300 used is a device from Courage and Khazaka.

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