Properties of Vegetal Oil-based Creams in Skin Care

Oct 1, 2011 | Contact Author | By: Kedar Kumthekar and Jayashree Nagarkar, PhD, Institute of Chemical Technology, Deemed University
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Title: Properties of Vegetal Oil-based Creams in Skin Care
vegetal oilsx emollientx rheologyx viscosityx moisturizationx skin irritationx
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Keywords: vegetal oils | emollient | rheology | viscosity | moisturization | skin irritation

Abstract: Tocopherols and tocotrienols are the major constituents of almond oil, safflower oil and palm oil. They are necessary for the normal growth and metabolism of healthy skin. These oils were formulated in nourishing skin care products and massage creams as part of stable o/w emulsions and were found to have excellent storage stability, flow properties, spreadability and moisturizing properties.

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K Kumthekar and J Nagarkar, Properties of Vegetal Oil-based Creams in Skin Care, Cosm & Toil 126(10) 702 (2011)

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The bioactivity of a product can be quantitatively measured and analyzed by assessing its ability to protect, retain normal moisture and delay the aging process of skin. O/W emulsions are commonly used cosmetic delivery systems that supply moisture to skin and improve its condition by forming an occlusive barrier on the skin surface.1 In recent years, scientists have been looking at utilizing natural resources in cosmetic products, as natural vegetal oils are readily available at affordable costs and have excellent cosmetic and skin care application properties such as soothing, moisturizing and skin penetrating. Vegetal oils such as soybean oil, corn oil, safflower oil and linseed oil are used for cosmeceutical purposes as w/o emulsions using single or mixed surfactants.2–4

Prunus dulcis (almond) oil, Carthamus tinctorius (safflower) oil and Passiflora aincarnata (palm) oil share oleic acid as a major fatty acid and are rich in tocopherols and tocotrienols. The added benefits of these oils are moisturizing, emollient and soothing properties that make them an alternative for a topical skin treatment. A literature survey revealed that few oils are explored in the form of o/w cosmetic formulation. Reports on rheological properties are scarce, and hence this study was conducted.

Cosmetic emulsions with phosphate-based surfactants derived from the long-chain Guerbet alcohols and a polymeric thickener were characterized by rheological measurements, particle size distribution and stability test.5, 6 Emulsifying agents play a vital role in emulsion stabilization, either by reducing the interfacial tension of the system and/or by forming an interfacial film with electrostatic properties around the dispersed globules. The proper concentration of surfactants and their mixtures give synergistic effect with respect to the stability of the emulsion by the proper matching of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) numbers of dispersed phase and surfactant used.7

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Table 1. Preparation of emulsifier blends

Table 1. Preparation of emulsifier blends

A series of emulsifier blends (see Table 1) with varying HLB numbers were found to be completely miscible in oil phase at 25 ± 0.1°C.

Table 2. Optimized cream parameters

Table 2. Optimized cream parameters

The optimized parameters of the cosmetic creams showing six months storage stability at 40°C ± 2°C/75%RH ± 5%RH are depicted in Table 2.

Table 3. Rheological parameters of formulated creams

Table 3. Rheological parameters of formulated creams

Table 3 shows the rheological parameters of formulated creams.

Figure 1. Moisturizing Property of formulated creams

Figure 1. Moisturizing Property of formulated creams

Figure 1 graphically shows the hydration efficacy study for the measurement of skin water content.

Footnotes (CT1110 Kumthekar)

a Span 80 (INCI: Sorbitan Monooleate) is a product manufactured by M/s. S. D. Fine chemicals Ltd., Mumbai, India.
b Tween 80 (INCI: Polysorbate 80) is a product of M/s. S. D. Fine chemicals Ltd. Mumbai, India.
c Almonessentials, Roghan Badam, Almond Drops Almond Oil (INCI: Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis Oil) is a product manufactured by M/s. Ashwin Pharma Ltd., Mumbai, India.
d Safflite, Saffola, Safogemini Safflower Oil (INCI: Carthamus Tinctorius Seed Oil) is a product manufactured by M/s. Ashwin Pharma Ltd., Mumbai, India.
e Palmernel, Lipipalm, Herbpalm Palm Oil (INCI: Passiflora Aincarnata Oil) is a product manufactured by M/s. Ashwin Pharma Ltd., Mumbai, India.
f Aquasorb (INCI: Carboxy Methyl Cellulose) is a product manufactured by M/s. Ashwin Pharma Ltd., Mumbai, India.
g Xantural (INCI: Xanthan Gum) a product manufactured by M/s. Ashwin Pharma Ltd., Mumbai, India.
h Galactosol (INCI: Guar Gum) a product manufactured by M/s. Ashwin Pharma Ltd., Mumbai, India.
i An EQ-610 pH meter was used, manufactured by Equiptronics, Mumbai, India.
j The Haake VT 500 Rotational Viscometer is manufactured by Thermo Scientific, Waltham, Mass., USA.
k The Thermo Rheowin 2.97 software is manufactured by Thermo Scientific, Waltham, Mass., USA. m The DC-5 cooling system was manufactured by Thermo Scientific, Waltham, Mass., USA.
n The CM-825PC corneometer is manufactured by Courage & Khazaka GmbH in Cologne, Germany.

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