Triggering Physical Response Via Aroma in Lip Gloss

May 1, 2008 | Contact Author | By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries Magazine
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Title: Triggering Physical Response Via Aroma in Lip Gloss
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Lip gloss imparts shine, may add color and occasionally provides moisturization. However, just as the concepts of cosmeceuticals and nutricosmetics have moved into makeup, lip gloss has taken on new roles. In addition to the standard benefits imparted by lip gloss, consumers can experience extra benefits they may not normally think to expect. Because the lips are a gateway into the body, formulators are devising new ways to benefit the body through them. In addition, the lips’ location near the nose provides perfumers with a new opportunity to incorporate olfactory response materials into lip gloss.

Recent lip gloss claims include aiding in weight loss, cessation of smoking and more. Fuji Blend Lip Gloss with Appetite Suppressant is said to reduce the user’s desire to eat sweets with appetite inhibitors, sugar blockers, energizing herbs and refreshing mint. Recently, Two Faced launched Slenderize Guilt Free Lip Gloss, a product incorporating chromium to increase the user’s energy from food; L-carnitine to boost energy; and super citrimax to support healthy metabolism, maintain a normal appetite and increase energy.

From reducing toxins in the body to attracting the opposite sex, a broad range of claims have been made. According to Marcia L. Pelchat, PhD, an associate member and sensory psychologist at Monell Chemical Senses Center, most of the effects induced by these lip glosses involve sensory reactions.

“Lip gloss is a great place to put an aroma, as it is under your nose. Aromatherapy has been around for a long time,” says Pelchat, who finds that formulators are utilizing effects not normally associated with a given aroma to elicit a particular result.

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