Structured Surfactant Systems for Deposition of Perfume on Skin and Hair

Jan 1, 2103 | Contact Author | By: Caroline Mabille, PhD, Rhodia Aubervilliers Research and Technical Center, Aubervilliers Cedex, France; and Maud Bassereau, Takasago Europe Perfumery Laboratory, Saint-Ouen L’Aumône, France
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Structured Surfactant Systems for Deposition of Perfume on Skin and Hair
structured surfactant systemsx fragrancex encapsulationx depositionx long-lastingx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: structured surfactant systems | fragrance | encapsulation | deposition | long-lasting

Abstract: To maximize perfume delivery from structured cleansing formulations, the fragrance must be introduced before structuring the formulation into multilamellar vesicles. Structured formulations fragranced in such a way are shown here to improve perfume deposition and duration versus micellar systems, with no negative impact on perfume burst during use.

View citation for this article

C Mabille and M Bassereau, Structured surfactant systems for improved, lasting deposition of perfume on skin and hair, Cosm & Toil 128(1) 34-41 (Jan 2013)

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

A majority of cleansing formulations on the market are made of surfactants that form simple micelles. This organization of the surfactants, however, often fails to provide enough yield to durably suspend insoluble ingredients such as silicone emulsions, anti-dandruff particles or moisturizing oils. Thus, they require the addition of a rheological polymer agent, e.g., carbomer or acrylates copolymer, which can jeopardize sensorial attributes of the product including foam and texture, as well as performance.

Recently, surfactant technologies forming multilamellar vesicles have been developed and introduced into cleansing formulations that durably suspend insoluble ingredients without the need for a suspending agent. Previously it has been shown that structured surfactant systems can be used to design cleansing products to deliver improved consumer benefits, such as skin moisturization and hair conditioning, over micellar systems. Structured surfactant systems also enable the design of multifunctional products. The present article considers their effects on fragrance in cleansing products.

Fragrance plays a key role in consumer appeal and brand differentiation and is therefore a crucial component of cleansing formulations; typically, it is also the most costly. Increasing the effectiveness of perfume burst and delivery are therefore two approaches to minimizing formulation costs. This article describes how to formulate structured formulations to deliver the most fragrance to skin or hair, versus micellar systems, as well as improve its duration with no negative impact on perfume burst.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

 

Close

Table 1. Cleansing formulations used

Table 1. Cleansing formulations used

Composition of the cleansing formulations used in the study (in % w/w)

Table 2. Evolution of perfume intensity on skin, over time

Table 2. Evolution of perfume intensity on skin, over time

Evolution over time of perfume intensity on skin when washed with a structured or micellar formulation

Table 3. Evolution of perfume intensity on hair, over time

Table 3. Evolution of perfume intensity on hair, over time

Evolution over time of perfume intensity on hair when washed with a structured or micellar formulation

Figure 1. Cumulated intensity of perfume on skin

Figure 1. Cumulated intensity of perfume on skin

Cumulated intensity of perfume deposited on skin from introduction of the fragrance after the first structuring step (Formula A-1), and introduction of the fragrance before structuring (Formula A-2).

Figure 2. Evolution of fragrance intensity on skin with and without rice bran oil

Figure 2. Evolution of fragrance intensity on skin with and without rice bran oil

Evolution of fragrance intensity on skin for structured formulation containing 12% rice bran oil (Formula A-2) and the same formulation without oil (Formula B). Note: For both formulas, the perfume was introduced before structuring the system into multilamellar vesicles.

Figure 3. Model of fragrance incorporation for cleansing formulations

Figure 3. Model of fragrance incorporation for cleansing formulations

Model of fragrance incorporation for structured cleansing formulations with: a) fragrance introduced after structuring and b) fragrance introduced before structuring

Footnotes

a Miracare SLB 365 (INCI: Water (aqua) (and) Sodium Trideceth Sulfate (and) Sodium Lauroamphoacetate (and) Cocamide MEA);
b Rhodapex ES-2K (INCI: Sodium Laureth Sulfate);
c Mirataine BET C30 (INCI: Cocamidopropyl Betaine); and
d Jaguar C17 (INCI: Guar Hydroxypropyl-trimonium Chloride) are products of Rhodia.
e The detailed procedure is available upon request to the corresponding author.

Next image >