Smart Materials for Triggered Release of Cosmetics

Jul 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Steven Isaacman, PhD, Nanometics LLC; and Michael Isaacman, University of California Santa Barbara
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Smart Materials for Triggered Release of Cosmetics
smart polymersx light-responsive materialsx temperature-reponsive materialsx pH-responsive materialsx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: smart polymers | light-responsive materials | temperature-reponsive materials | pH-responsive materials

Abstract: Smart polymers can be engineered to contain reactive molecules, commonly dubbed “molecular switches,” that respond to external stimuli and cause systemic changes to the polymer structure. The specificity of a molecular switch to a single stimulus is critical for controlled release, although multi-triggered systems capable of responding to systematic stimuli are being developed for advanced applications. Herein the authors describe several stimuli-responsive materials that have potential applications for personal care and related biomedical fields.

View citation for this article

S Isaacman and M Isaacman, Smart Materials for Triggerred Release of Cosmetics, Cosm & Toil 128(7) 462 (2013)

Market Data

  • The global cosmeceuticals market is growing at a rate of 7.7% annually, and is poised to reach $42.4 billion by 2018.
  • While wanting products that have near medical-level results, consumers also still seek green and eco-friendly options.
  • Research and tests backing up products claims are increasingly sought by consumers.
view full article

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Advanced materials that are capable of undergoing physical or chemical changes in response to external stimuli have great potential in the fields of medicine, biotechnology, electronics and personal care.1–3 Commonly referred to as “smart polymers,” these materials can respond to temperature, pH, light, sound and mechanical forces, among others.

A variety of smart polymers exist for applications including self-healing materials, tissue engineering, medical imaging and data storage. Liquid crystalline displays are a prime example of an optically responsive material that has led to an immensely profitable industry; however, self-assembling micelles and gels are the most relevant to personal care, having potential for molecular encapsulation and triggered release.

Smart polymers can be engineered to contain reactive molecules, commonly dubbed “molecular switches,” that respond to external stimuli and cause systemic changes to the polymer structure. For example, chemical or electronic changes disrupt the polymeric macromolecular structure and trigger the subsequent release of entrapped compounds (see Figure 1).

Such changes can be engineered to be reversible or irreversible, depending on the end use. The specificity of a molecular switch to a single stimulus is critical for controlled release, although multi-triggered systems capable of responding to systematic stimuli are being developed for advanced applications. Herein the authors describe several stimuli-responsive materials that have potential applications for personal care and related biomedical fields.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

Close

Figure 1. Schematic illustration of stimuli-induced disruption of a spherical microparticle, resulting in the release of a molecular payload

Figure 1. Schematic illustration of stimuli-induced disruption of a spherical microparticle, resulting in the release of a molecular payload

Chemical or electronic changes disrupt the polymeric macromolecular structure and trigger the subsequent release of entrapped compounds (see Figure 1).

Figure 2. Spiropyran is a reversible molecular switch

Figure 2. Spiropyran is a reversible molecular switch

When irradiated with UV light, it switches to a charged fluorescent form but when exposed to visible light, it reverts to its original uncharged non-fluorescent state.

Figure 3. pNIPAM-based microgels loaded with peptides swell when cooled, releasing their payload in hours

Figure 3. pNIPAM-based microgels loaded with peptides swell when cooled, releasing their payload in hours

But at body temperature, the particles collapse and restrict the payload release over weeks.

Next image >

 
 

Close

It's Free...

Register or Log in to get full access to this content

Registration includes:

  • Access to all premium content
  • One click ingredient sample requests
  • Save articles in the My Library tool

Create an Account or Log In