Recent in Delivery (page 5 of 5)

Formulating Focus—Delivering Actives via Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Part IV, Percutaneous Absorption and Dermal Cosmetic Formulations

In this fourth part of a five-part series discusses the percutaneous absorption of actives loaded into solid lipid SLNs and NLCs and their formulation in dermal cosmetics.

Pseudopeptidic Compounds for Biocompatible Gels: A Review

Simple pseudopeptides derived from natural amino acids can be designed and prepared as efficient gelators for a variety of solvents, and with a high potential for biocompatibility. The appropriate selection of structural components, reviewed herein, shows how to produce gels with tailored properties, including high thermal stability.

Formulating Focus—Delivering Actives via Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Part III, Stability and Efficacy

Part I of this review on Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLCs) discussed the differences of these two delivery systems for cosmetic actives, as well as their production methods and selection criteria for constituents. In Part II, the characterization of these nano-sized particles was considered. In Part III, presented here, their stability and efficacy are considered; Part IV will address their application in cosmetics.

Delivering Actives via Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Part II, Nanoparticle Characterization

Part I of this review on Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLCs) as delivery systems for cosmetic actives appeared in the October 2010 issue of Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine. Part II, presented here, describes how to characterize SLNs and NLCs; part III, in March 2012, will discuss the stability and occlusion properties of actives and liquids in SLNs and NLCs, and examine their efficacy. Finally, part IV, in May 2012, will discuss the use of SLNs and NLCs in cosmetic products.

Improving Deposition From High-water Formulas Using Amphiphilic Polymers

Effective high-water skin care systems may play an important role in addressing emerging market consumer needs. The present study considers the challenges of such systems, particularly regarding the deposition of ingredients across water solubilities, and proposes an amphiphilic cationic polymer as one possible solution.

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