Lysine Polypeptides for Dandruff Treatment

Aug 22, 2014 | Contact Author | By: Derry K. Mercer, PhD, Lorna Miller, Jennifer Robertson; Linda Turvey; and Deborah A. O’Neil, PhD, NovaBiotics Ltd.
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Lysine Polypeptides for Dandruff Treatment
dandruffx Malasseziax peptidex seborrhoeic dermatitisx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: dandruff | Malassezia | peptide | seborrhoeic dermatitis

Abstract: Dandruff remains a significant yet poorly served chronic scalp disorder for which more effective treatments are required. Here, lysine polypeptides are demonstrated in vitro and in vivo to effectively address the causative organism in dandruff, Malassezia spp., and provide a potential basis for new treatments to counteract this condition.

View citation for this article

J Robertson, L Turvey and DA O’Neil, Lysine Polypeptides for Dandruff Treatment, Cosmet & Toil 129(9) 60 (2014)

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Dandruff, a common scalp disorder, is considered to be a mild form of seborrhoeic dermatitis but without overt inflammation. It can lead to more severe seborrhoeic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor and atopic dermatitis.1, 2 Dandruff has a multifactorial etiology, characterized by the lipophilic yeasts of the fungi genus Malassezia spp., sebum production and other factors that affect scalp health, such as environmental stress and hormonal changes.3 Consistent with the importance of Malassezia spp. in the etiology of dandruff is the fact that the most effective treatments for dandruff are antifungal agents, e.g., zinc pyrithione and ketoconazole that are usually applied as shampoos.4 Improvements in flaking also are highly correlated with reductions in the level of Malassezia spp. on the scalp.5

It is widely believed that increases in sebum production during puberty allow for the proliferation of Malassezia spp. on the scalp, especially M. globosa and M. restricta,1 since these entities use sebum lipids as a nutrient source. Secreted sebum consists of triglycerides and esters that are broken down by the dermal microbiota into diglycerides, monoglycerides and free fatty acids. Malassezia spp. produce lipases that hydrolyze triglycerides to generate specific saturated fatty acids, including oleic, that are used as nutrients and can also elicit a flaking response in dandruff-susceptible individuals.6 These free fatty acids play a key role in the initiation of the irritant response at the onset of dandruff.1

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

 

Close

Table 1. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Lysine Polypeptides Versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536

Table 1. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Lysine Polypeptides Versus <em>M. pachydermatis</em> CBS6536

The tested polypeptides were either produced by solid-phase synthesis or purchased; the characteristics of the polypeptides, including molecular weights (Da) and amino acid residues, are shown here.

Table 2. Antimicrobial Efficacy of NP108

Table 2. Antimicrobial Efficacy of NP108 Versus M. furfur and M. pachydermatis

NP108 was then tested for antimicrobial efficacy versus M. furfur DSMZ6170, M. pachydermatis NCPF3667 and M. pachydermatis CBS6536.

Figure 1. Antimicrobial efficacy of NP108 versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536 (A) and M. furfur DSMZ6170 (B) in commercially available conditioners; ZP = Zinc pyrithione

Figure 1. Antimicrobial efficacy of NP108 versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536 (A) and M. furfur DSMZ6170 (B) in commercially available conditioners; ZP = Zinc pyrithione

Only 3 min of exposure to a hair conditioner containing 1.0% w/v NP108 eradicated or at least significantly reduced the number of recoverable CFU of M. pachydermatis CNS6536 and M. furfur DSMZ6170, respectively.

Figure 2. Antimicrobial efficacy of NP108 in a 65% (w/v) PEG-14M vehicle versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536

Figure 2. Antimicrobial efficacy of 0.5% and 1.0% (w/v) NP108 in a 65% (w/v) PEG-14M vehicle versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536

As shown here, 0.5% and 1.0% w/v NP108 could kill M. pachydermatis CBS6536, creating zones of clearance after application to 1.5% w/v agarose plates.

Figure 3. Efficacy of NP108 versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536

Figure 3. Efficacy of NP108 versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536 in the frequent use conditioner and leave-in serum

Shown here is the efficacy of NP108 versus M. pachydermatis CBS6536 in the frequent use conditioner and leave-in serum—note that the contact time for a leave-in serum is significantly longer than for a conditioner and is, therefore, likely to improve antimicrobial efficacy.

Figure 4. Reduction in M. pachydermatis CBS6536 skin burden following treatment with 5% (w/v) NP108 or 2% (w/v) miconazole 10 days post-infection.

Figure 4. Reduction in M. pachydermatis CBS6536 skin burden following treatment with 5% (w/v) NP108 or 2% (w/v) miconazole 10 days post-infection

The horizontal bars refer to the mean number of CFU per mouse.

Footnotes (CT1410 Mercer)

a NP114, NP115, Peptisyntha SA

b, c All other ingredients, Sigma-Aldrich

d LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Kit, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.

Next image >

 
 

Close

It's Free...

Register or Log in to get full access to this content

Registration includes:

  • Access to all premium content
  • One click ingredient sample requests
  • Save articles in the My Library tool

Create an Account or Log In