Polymers in Personal Care

Jul 1, 2010 | Contact Author | By: Eric Abrutyn, TPC2 Advisors Ltd., Inc.
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Polymers in Personal Care
polymersx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract

Keywords: polymers

Abstract: Polymer use began in the 1800s with cellulose derivatives, the vulcanization of rubber, and styrene synthesis; but in reality, it started more than four million years ago with the formation of DNA and proteins. Polymers are a diverse class of chemistry. By definition, they are large molecules made up of chains or rings of linked monomer units—simple reactive building blocks. Smaller molecules or monomers are combined to form polymers that possess a characteristic chain structure of multiple repeating units that can be related or different.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Polymer use began in the 1800s with cellulose derivatives, the vulcanization of rubber, and styrene synthesis; but in reality, it started more than four million years ago with the formation of DNA and proteins. Polymers are a diverse class of chemistry. By definition, they are large molecules made up of chains or rings of linked monomer units—simple reactive building blocks. Smaller molecules or monomers are combined to form polymers that possess a characteristic chain structure of multiple repeating units that can be related or different.

While similar polymers can be grouped into classifications, they often still differ somewhat in structure, performance or their main component(s). As a result, not all same-named polymers are necessarily the same in performance or structural morphology. Typically the side groups on the backbone of a polymer influence its functional properties, even when present in small molar percentages. Understanding what side groups are attached and where will allow one to better understand the potential impact of the pendent side groups to the molecule’s functionality—and will thus assist the formulating chemist in choosing the proper ingredient for the desired results.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

 

Close

Figure 1. Typical polymer structures

Typical polymer structures

Typical polymer structures are:1 a) homopolymer; b) alternating copolymer; c) block copolymer; d) random copolymer; e) graft copolymer; f) linear copolymer; g) branched copolymer; and h) cross-linked copolymer.

Figure 2. Products containing polymers

Figure 2. Products containing polymers

Products used by consumers4 for beautification and topical improvements to skin and hair

Biography: Eric S. Abrutyn, TPC2 Advisors Ltd., Inc.

Eric S. Abrutyn, TPC2 Advisors Ltd., Inc.

Eric S. Abrutyn is an active member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, a Cosmetics & Toiletries scientific advisory board member, and chairman of the Personal Care Products Council’s International Nomenclature Cosmetic Ingredient (INCI) Committee. Recently retired from Kao Brands, Abrutyn founded TPC2 Advisors Ltd., Inc., a personal care consultancy. He has more than 35 years of experience in the raw material supplier and skin and hair care manufacturer aspects of personal care.

Next image >

 
 

Close

It's Free...

Register or Log in to get full access to this content

Registration includes:

  • Access to all premium content
  • One click ingredient sample requests
  • Save articles in the My Library tool

Create an Account or Log In