Feasibility Study of Sago Starch for Perfumed and Cooling Body Powders

Dec 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: Prapaporn Boonme, Mattha Aporn, Sirowan Khwankaew, Wiwat Pichayakorn, Pilaiwan Prapruti and Somsak Boromthanarat, Prince of Songkla University
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Title: Feasibility Study of Sago Starch for Perfumed and Cooling Body Powders
body powderx dusting powderx sago starchx powder characterizationx Thai international standards (TIS)x
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Keywords: body powder | dusting powder | sago starch | powder characterization | Thai international standards (TIS)

Abstract: In the present article, sago starch-containing perfumed and cooling body powders are formulated and their physicochemical properties for potential skin irritation are examined. The results indicate that sago starch could potentially be used as the main component in body powders.

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Cosmetic products composed of natural ingredients have been gaining popularity for some time. In relation, commercial body and dusting powders containing natural starches, e.g., corn, potato, rice and tapioca, have been launched, as several patents reveal.1, 2 Another natural ingredient for application in powder products can be found in the wetland forests of southern Thailand, where sago palms (Metroxylon sagu Rottb.) are plentiful.

Sago palms can be harvested at anywhere from 7 to 15 years’ maturity prior to their flowering, at which point they produce fruit and perish. When harvested, their piths are filled with a fine, white, powdery starch that is nearly pure carbohydrate.3,4 This sago starch can be used as the main component in perfumed and cooling body power formulations, as will be shown here. Additional benefits of sago starch are its biodegradable properties, which reduce respiratory risk potential from accidental inhalation. Also, the use of sago starch can further support local wetland forest communities, thus promoting sustainability of this natural resource.

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Table 1. Physicochemical properties(age 8 and 15)

 Table 1. Physicochemical properties

Table 2. Physicochemical properties of sago starch-containing vs. commercial body powders

 Table 2. Physicochemical properties of sago starch-containing vs. commercial body powders

Table 3. Specific properties according to TIS 443-2525

 Table 3. Specific properties according to TIS 443-2525 

Table 4. Test subject ratings of the prepared perfumed sago

 Table 4. Test subject ratings of the prepared perfumed sago

Table 5. Test subject ratings of the prepared cooling sago

 Table 5. Test subject ratings of the prepared cooling sago

Figure 1. SEM micrograph of sago starch

 Figure 1. SEM micrograph of sago starch

Figure 2. SEM micrographs of perfumed

 Figure 2. SEM micrographs of perfumed 

Figure 3. SEM micrographs of cooling sago

 Figure 3. SEM micrographs of cooling sago 

Boonme Sago Starch footnotes

 a The Mastersizer E device used for this study is a product from Malvern, UK.

b The JSM-5800 LV SEM is a device from JEOL, Japan.
c The optical microscope used for this study is a device from Olympus, Japan. 
d The jolting apparatus used for this study is 
a device from J. Engelsmann AG, Germany.
e The Orion Model 410A pH meter is a device from  Orion Research Inc., USA.
f The Hermle Z323 K ultracentrifuge is a device from Hermle Labortechnik, Wehingen, Germany.
g The Model Genesys 6 spectrometer is a device from Thermo Electron Corp., USA.

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