A Hydrophilic Silicone Elastomer for Broader Formulating Flexibility

Nov 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Isabelle Van Reeth and Xinyan R. Bao, Dow Corning (China) Holding Co., Ltd.; Kelli Dib and Roxanne Haller, Dow Corning Corp.
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Title: A Hydrophilic Silicone Elastomer for Broader Formulating Flexibility
hydrophilicx silicone elastomerx organic compatibilityx polar activesx glycerinx
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Keywords: hydrophilic | silicone elastomer | organic compatibility | polar actives | glycerin

Abstract: Silicone elastomers for personal care have evolved from cross-linked silicone polymers in silicone fluid carriers, to materials with broader organic compatibility in organic solvents. Recently, hydrophilic properties have been added, which are shown here to enable the incorporation of high levels of water, polar solvents and actives while maintaining organic compatibility and unique sensory characteristics.

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Silicone elastomers have claimed a strong position in the realm of skin care and color cosmetics as consumers continue to focus on luxurious aesthetics, distinctive textures and comfortable wear. First-generation silicone elastomers introduced a dry, powdery sensation that left a unique after-feel on the skin.1 As the technology advanced, these cross-linked silicone polymers expanded beyond carrier fluids such as dimethicone and cyclomethicone, to other organic volatile ingredients that extended their formulating possibilities2 and allowed broader capabilities with organic materials.

A recent development takes the versatility of silicone elastomers a step further by combining an alkyl methyl siloxane carrier fluid of moderate volatility with a high molecular weight polyglycol-modified silicone elastomer, referred to as a hydro elastomer blend. The result is a material that meets the difficult formulating challenge of combining organic compatibility with the ability to incorporate water and/or polar solvents with polar actives, as will be shown. Note that for ease of reading, in this article, the following nomenclature is used: silicone elastomer blend, where INCI = Dimethicone Crosspolymer; silicone organic elastomer blend, where INCI = Dimethicone/bis-Isobutyl PPG-20 Crosspolymer; and hydro elastomer blend, where INCI = PEG-12 Dimethicone/PPG-20 Crosspolymer.

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Figure 1. Two-dimensional representation of three-dimensional silicone elastomer network

Figure 1. Two-dimensional representation of three-dimensional silicone elastomer network. Note: for illustrative purposes only; specific silicone or polyether chain lengths are neither indicated nor implied.

Figure 2. Dilution viscosity with the hydro elastomer blend

Figure 2. Dilution viscosity with the hydro elastomer blend, compared with other silicone elastomers.

Figure 3. Compatibility of the hydro elastomer blend with a silicone organic elastomer blend and a silicone elastomer blend

Figure 3. Compatibility of the hydro elastomer blend with a silicone organic elastomer blend and a silicone elastomer blend. Photo copyright: Dow Corning

Figure 4. Paired comparison of sensory characteristics for a silicone elastomer blend and the hydro elastomer blend

Figure 4. Paired comparison of sensory characteristics for a silicone elastomer blend and the hydro elastomer blend; numbers in parentheses indicate level of confidence.

Figure 5. Sensory characteristics of three test formulations containing high levels of glycerin

Figure 5. Sensory characteristics of three test formulations containing high levels of glycerin; numbers in parentheses indicate level of confidence.

Figure 6. Comparison of moisture retention in gels with and without the hydro elastomer blend

Figure 6. Comparison of moisture retention in gels with and without the hydro elastomer blend; number in parentheses represents confidence level.

Figure 7. Sensory comparison of hydro elastomer blend, silicone organic elastomer blend and silicone elastomer blend

Figure 7. Sensory comparison of hydro elastomer blend, silicone organic elastomer blend and silicone elastomer blend; numbers in parentheses indicate level of confidence.

Figure 8. Sensory characteristics of mousses based on three formulations

Figure 8. Sensory characteristics of mousses based on three formulations

Figure 9. Mousse formulations based on ingredient variations

Figure 9. Mousse formulations based on ingredient variations. Photo copyright: Dow Corning

a-f

a EL-7040 Hydro Elastomer Blend (INCI: Caprylyl methicone (and) PEG-12 Dimethicone/PPG-20 Crosspolymer) is a product of Dow Corning.

b 9045 Silicone Elastomer Blend (INCI: Cyclopentasiloxane (and) Dimethicone Crosspolymer) and

c EL-8050 ID Silicone Elastomer Blend (INCI: Isododecane (and) Dimethicone/ bis-Isobutyl PPG-20 Crosspolymer) are products of Dow Corning Corp.

d 9041 Silicone Elastomer Blend (INCI: Dimethicone (and) Dimethicone Crosspolymer);

e EL-8052 IH Silicone Elastomer Blend (INCI: isohexadecane (and) Dimethicone/bis-Isobutyl PPG 20 Crosspolymer ); and

f ES-5612 Formulation Aid (INCI: PEG-10 Dimethicone) are products of Dow Corning Corp.

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