Pisum Sativum Extract for Safe- and Self-Tanning

Aug 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: Isabelle Imbert, PhD; Anne Francoise Clay; Joel Mantelin and Houha Domloge, PhD, ISP/Vincience
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Title: Pisum Sativum Extract for Safe- and Self-Tanning
pheomelaninx eumelaninx Skin Types I-VIx DHAx Maillard reactionx Pisum sativum extractx
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Keywords: pheomelanin | eumelanin | Skin Types I-VI | DHA | Maillard reaction | Pisum sativum extract

Abstract: The cosmetic industry is challenged to develop active ingredients to provide the skin with a natural, healthy glow without sunlight exposure. Here, the author examines the effects of Pisum sativum extract on melanocytes and shows a time- and dose-dependent increase in skin tone, also suggesting the material could protect skin from UV damage.

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The desire for healthy, golden-brown skin has been uninterrupted for years. This social phenomenon started when Coco Chanel traveled to the French Riviera in the late 1930s and, after spending leisure time in a bikini, returned with a tan. In relation, tanning is popular because it indicates a social status—tanned skin implies that individuals have the means to take time off and relax in the sun.

In order to achieve a golden-brown tan, consumers expose their skin to sunlight since this induces pigmentation, i.e., melanin formation. An alternative to sun exposure is the application of a self-tanning agent that reacts with the skin by producing a brown-orange tone without exposure to sunlight.1 In the past few years, self-tanning agents have gained popularity due to improved formulations allowing for better homogenization on the skin surface. However, increased tanning often provides individuals with a false sense of security.

Studies show that most individuals with darker skin feel unconcerned about the risk of photo-aging and skin cancer.2 Therefore, the cosmetic industry faces a difficult challenge: to develop active ingredients to provide the skin with a natural, healthy glow without sunlight exposure—i.e., safe tanning. In addition, ideally this challenge should take into account the increased market demand for nature-based technologies and eco-friendly products.

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Table 1. Quantitative Analysis of Fontana-Masson Data

 Table 1. Quantitative Analysis of Fontana-Masson Data

Figure 1. Chronologically aged skin versus sun-aged skin

 Figure 1.  Chronologically aged skin versus sun-aged skin

Figure 2. Dosage of IL-1 beta level

 Figure 2. Dosage of IL-1 beta level 

Figure 3. Ex vivo evaluation of Pisum sativum extract

 Figure 3. Ex vivo evaluation of Pisum sativum extract 

Figure 4. Quantitative analysis of Fontana-Masson data

 Figure 4. Quantitative analysis of Fontana-Masson data

Figure 5. Ex vivo evaluation of Pisum sativum extract propertie

 Figure 5. Ex vivo evaluation of Pisum sativum extract propertie

Figure 6. Clinical evaluation of Pisum sativum extract-treated skin

 Figure 6. Clinical evaluation of Pisum sativum extract-treated skin

Figure 7. Quantitative evaluation of skin pigmentation

 Figure 7. Quantitative evaluation of skin pigmentation

Figure 8. Evaluation profiles of skin pigmentation during treatment

Figure 8. Evaluation profiles of skin pigmentation during treatment 

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