Part II: The Clinical Effects of a Natural Dipeptide on the Biological Cascade

Sep 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Philippe Mondon, Sebastian Fache and Emmanuel Doridot - Sederma; Karl Lintner, PhD - Sederma and KAL'idees
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Title: Part II: The Clinical Effects of a Natural Dipeptide on the Biological Cascade
skin elasticityx peptidex ptosisx FOITSx non-contact skin measurementx
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Keywords: skin elasticity | peptide | ptosis | FOITS | non-contact skin measurement

Abstract: The peptide N-Acetyl-Tyr-Arg-Hexadecylester (NATAH), found in Part I to stimulate the production of elastic fibers in vitro, was next tested in vivo for its capacity to improve skin elasticity parameters, using various biophysical and imaging techniques. Significant differences in facial ptosis and extensibility were observed in the 56-day, vehicle-controlled clinical study described here.

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P Mondon, S Fache, E Doridot and K Lintner, Elastin and elastic fibers, part II: The clinical effects of a natural dipeptide on the biological cascade, Cosm & Toil 127(9) 658-664 (Sep 2012)

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Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Editor’s note: This article is the second in a two-part series describing the anti-aging effects of a natural dipeptide. Described herein are clinical studies, whereas Part I considered in vitro efficacy.

Facial sagging is associated with aging and essentially is caused by changes in skin elasticity, fat mass and facial muscle function in the cheek. Ezure et al. established and described in detail correlations between sagging level scores and skin elasticity measurements, as assessed by suction, with fat content and facial muscle function in middle-aged female volunteers. The underlying causes of these symptoms are ultraviolet (UV) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced damages to the connective tissue, i.e., collagen and elastin fibers; enzymatic hydrolysis; reduced renewal of macromolecular synthesis; chronic background inflammation; and the like.

Cosmetic research over the past decades has succeeded in developing products to address some of these symptoms and causes, including retinoids, matrikines, free radical scavenger enzymes and other substances shown to prevent and/or reduce the appearance of wrinkles, thinning skin and impaired barrier. However, only more recently has the specific mechanism of reinvigorating the synthesis, assembly and deposition of elastic fibers to combat the signs of sagging facial skin been investigated.

The present paper describes clinical trials carried out with the peptide using three techniques of analysis: a novel, noninvasive biophysical instrument; fast optical in vivo topometry of human skin (FOITS); and professional photography coupled with quantitative image analysis. 

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Table 1. Creams used in clinical studies

Table 1. Creams used in clinical studies

A cream formulated with 300 ppm NATAH and a placebo cream were applied, each to one-half of the face using light massaging, twice daily for two months.

Table 2. R25 Cohesion

Table 2. R25 Cohesion

R25 Cohesion; variation in the mechanical properties of the skin after application of the two creams on the face for one and two months

Table 3. Uf (mm) Firmness

Table 3. Uf (mm) Firmness

Uf (mm) Firmness; variation in the mechanical properties of the skin after application of the two creams on the face for one and two months

Figure 1. Schematic of the compressed air jet approach

Figure 1. Schematic of the compressed air jet approach

Schematic of the compressed air jet approach measuring the firmness parameter, Uf, and parameter R25, reflecting resistance

Figure 2. Firmness parameter, Uf, and R25 measurements

Figure 2. Firmness parameter, Uf, and R25 measurements

This approach enables the measurement of three-dimensional deformation of skin in addition to conventional parameters such as the firmness parameter (Uf).

Figure 3. Schematic of the triangular zone measurement

Figure 3. Schematic of the triangular zone measurement

Schematic of the measurement of the triangular zone with simulation of sagging by suspension of a constant weight

Figure 4. Linear regression line correlating age (in years) to R25

Figure 4. Linear regression line correlating age (in years) to R25

Linear regression line correlating age (in years) to R25, the parameter indicating resistance of the skin to deformation by the compressed air jet

Figure 5. Photographically recorded effects

Figure 5. Photographically recorded effects

Photographically recorded effects on the same volunteer a) at T0, and b) at T1 month

Figure 6. Facial “lifting"

Figure 6. Facial “lifting"

Facial “lifting,” as quantified on 26 panelists by the described method

Figure 7. Facial sagging

Figure 7. Facial sagging

Figure 7. Facial sagging as assessed using a 35-g weight in the same volunteer a) at T0 and b) at T1 month

Figure 8. Curvature of the face obtained by FOITS

Figure 8. Curvature of the face obtained by FOITS

3-D image of the curvature of the face obtained by FOITS, a) before and b) after 2 months; the radius increased by 26%.

Figure 9. Change in the radius of curvature of the jowls

Figure 9. Change in the radius of curvature of the jowls

Change in the radius of curvature of the jowls; an increase in the radius indicates a decrease in the curvature, i.e., a smoother, more regular jaw line.

Footnotes [Mondon 127(9)]

a The Cutometer is a device manufactured by Courage & Khazaka.

b Phenion is a registered trademark of Phenion GmbH & Co KG.

c The Torquemeter, and
d the Ballistometer are devices manufactured by Diastron Ltd.

e The Aeroflexmeter is a device developed by Sederma.

f Image software is manufactured by the National Institutes of Health.

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