Human Growth Factors as Natural Healers: Current Literature and Application

May 1, 2010 | Contact Author | By: Celeste Hilling, Skin Authority
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Title: Human Growth Factors as Natural Healers: Current Literature and Application
human growth factorsx wound healingx skin regenerationx collagenx cytokinesx
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Keywords: human growth factors | wound healing | skin regeneration | collagen | cytokines

Abstract: The medical community’s research toward the advancement of healing and tissue regeneration has identified Human Growth Factors (HGF) as critical components in cutaneous wound healing, suggesting their potential for skin cell rejuvenation. Here, the author reviews the present work in this area and proposes HGFs for skin regeneration and reparative products, providing an example.

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C Hilling, Human growth factors as natural healers: Current literature and application, Cosm & Toil 125(5) 73-78 (May 2010)

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Editor’s note: As is well-known, consumer demand exists for active products that provide drug-like effects for cosmetic benefits, such as those described here. Product developers are reminded that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviews label claims to determine whether a product requires drug registration or may be classified as a cosmetic. In addition, it should be noted that human materials are banned from use in cosmetics in the European Union.

With marketing using superficial terms such as crow’s feet, zits and liver spots, it is easy for consumers to overlook the important fact that human skin is a dynamic, living organ, and since cosmetic appearance is a driving force in consumer perception, skin care studies and research often focus on the effects of moisture-bearing properties to plump dead, keratinized surface cells. Skin care is obviously much more than what is seen on the surface, which is why it is important to understand how cells grow, survive and reproduce in the human body. Understanding these mechanisms provides keys to unlocking diseases that result from abnormal cell development—e.g., physical deformities, senile dementia, slow wound healing and tumors.

The medical community’s research toward the advancement of healing and tissue regeneration has identified Human Growth Factors (HGF) as critical components in cutaneous wound healing, suggesting their potential for skin cell rejuvenation. Here, the author reviews the present work in this area and proposes HGFs for skin regeneration and reparative products, providing an example.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

 

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Figure 1. HGF functions

Figure 1. HGF functions

HGF proteins are produced naturally by ribosomes in many different cell types throughout the body and bind to receptors on the surface of cells primarily to activate cellular proliferation and/or differentiation. Growth factors play many key roles, as shown here.

Figure 2. Facial appearance before and after use of HGF-containing products

Figure 2. Facial appearance before and after use of HGF-containing products

In the skin, aged cells absorb nutrients from HGFs and revert to a more youthful state through angiogenesis and collagen production, among other mechanisms, especially in the facial area.

Footnotes [Hilling 125(5)]

a Botox is a registered trademark of Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA.

b Skin Growth Factor SGF4 is a product of Skin Authority, Carlsbad, CA, USA.

Growth Factors and Their Sources*

PDGFa: Platelets, macrophages, epithelial cells, endothelial cellsb, smooth muscle cells, bone matrix

TGF-βa: Platelets, macrophages, activated T lymphocytesb, osteoblasts, immature chondrocytes, bone matrix

EGF/TGF-α: Platelets, macrophages, epithelial cells, eosinophils (TGF-a)

IGF-la: Plasma, epithelial cells, endothelial cellsb, fibroblastsb, smooth muscle cells, osteoblasts, bone matrix

bFGF: Macrophages, endothelial cellsb, osteoblasts, immature and mature chondrocytes, bone matrix

IL-la: Monocytes and macrophages, keratinocytes, vascular endothelial cells, T and B lymphocytes, glioma cells

 

*taken from Reference 1

a When not specified, PDGF-AA, -BB and -AB are designated as PDGF; TGF-β1 and β2 as TGF-β; and IL-la and IL-lb as IL-I. IGF-II (skeletal growth factor) is also produced by osteoblasts and is present in bone matrix.

b Hypothesized from in vitro experiments

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