Formulating with Naturals—Anti-aging Actives

May 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Art Georgalas, Georgalas Endeavors
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Title: Formulating with Naturals—Anti-aging Actives
anti-aging activesx alpha-hydroxy acidsx salicylic acidx vitaminx dragon's bloodx scytoneminx kinetinx gotu kolax
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Keywords: anti-aging actives | alpha-hydroxy acids | salicylic acid | vitamin | dragon's blood | scytonemin | kinetin | gotu kola

Abstract: To provide consumers an anti-aging benefit, finished products and ingredients must ameliorate both firmness and lines and wrinkles. The loss of firmness, attributed primarily to the loss of underlying dermal support, is both a sign of skin aging and a cause of most lines and wrinkles. Thus, improving this underlying matrix to enhance skin’s appearance should be a key feature of anti-aging product performance.

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A Georgalas, Formulating with naturals—Anti-aging actives, Cosm & Toil 128(5) 306-312

Market Data

  • Global demand for organic personal care was more than $7.6 billion in 2012, and is expected to reach $13.2 billion by 2018.
  • The global organic market has grown due to increasing consumer concerns regarding personal health and hygiene.
  • Widening distribution channels and new product development have contributed to growth.
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To fight the seven signs of aging as outlined by P&G’s recent Olay Total Effects campaign, a formulation must address: lines and wrinkles, loss of firmness, visible pores, uneven skin tone, uneven texture, dullness and dryness. Addressing these signs should start with a vehicle that moisturizes the skin by providing both an emollient film to enhance skin’s natural barrier to water loss, and sufficient humectants to help retain that moisture in skin, to plasticize the stratum corneum (SC). That vehicle’s composition should also optimize the delivery of natural actives from the formula, an expertise exemplified by the late Johann Wiechers, PhD.

To provide consumers an anti-aging benefit, finished products and ingredients must ameliorate both firmness and lines and wrinkles. The loss of firmness, attributed primarily to the loss of underlying dermal support, is both a sign of skin aging and a cause of most lines and wrinkles. Thus, improving this underlying matrix to enhance skin’s appearance should be a key feature of anti-aging product performance.

A few databases and compendia are helpful in researching botanicals and phytochemicals for new leads and claims substantiation. For example, the International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary & Handbook, 14th Edition, lists more than 2,500 plant species as botanicals, with more than 250,000 known vascular plant species in existence. Since the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) S.784 in 1994, use of herbs, botanicals and their constituents as potential dietary supplement products has risen in popularity. This acceleration in the research and marketing of botanicals invigorated the personal care segment that previously had relegated botanical extracts to promotional ingredients—where they still remain in many products. However, with increased consumer demand for reducing the appearance of facial aging, phytochemicals and their source plants have gained credibility as skin care actives.

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This is an excerpt of an article from GCI Magazine. The full version can be found here.

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Footnotes [Georgalas 128(5)]

a STAY-C 50 (INCI: Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate) is manufactured by DSM, Heerlen, Netherlands.

b AA2G (INCI: Ascorbyl Glucoside) is manufactured by Hayashibara Biochemical Laboratories Inc., Japan.

c Amiperfect (INCI: Gaultheria Procumbens (Wintergreen)) Leaf Extract is manufactured by Alban Muller International, Vincennes, France.

d Cytokalmine (INCI: Maltitol (and) Punica Granatum) is manufactured by Alban Muller International, Vincennes, France.

e Crodarom Dragon’s Blood (INCI: Glycerin (and) Water (aqua) (and) Croton Lechleri Resin Extract) is manufactured by Croda, East Yorkshire, U.K.

f Vivitin (INCI: Kinetin) is manufactured by Vivimed Labs, Hyderabad, India.

g SymFinity (INCI: Echinacea Purpurea Extract) is manufactured by Symrise, Holzminden, Germany.

h BeauActive MTP (INCI: Hydrolyzed Milk Protein) is manufactured by DSM, Basel, Switzerland.

j Rejuverrin (INCI: Whey Protein) is manufactured by Lipo Chemicals, Paterson, N.J., USA.

 

Bio: Arthur Georgalas

Arthur Georgalas has conducted formulation work and applied research in various product categories at several leading cosmetic manufacturers, and more recently, established his consultancy, Georgalas Endeavors LLC. Georgalas is an active member of the IFSCC, SCC and NYSCC and has presented at many conferences. As an adjunct professor, he instructs two classes in the cosmetic science master’s program at Fairleigh Dickinson University, and presents courses in botanicals and formulation for the SCC Continuing Education Program. He also serves as a subject matter expert for the recently launched Cosmetics & Toiletries Complete Cosmetic Chemist course, “Developing Natural Cosmetic Formulations.”

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