Repairing Hair with Natural Actives

Jan 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Jean-Christophe Choulot, PhD ALES Group
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Title: Repairing Hair with Natural Actives
hair structurex natural activex electron microscopyx hair degradationx
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Keywords: hair structure | natural active | electron microscopy | hair degradation

Abstract: The present article reviews the structure of hair and various types of hair damage, demonstrating that repair treatments must intervene at several levels within hair. While film-forming agents are often used, they slow or prevent the penetration of actives. A hair serum including natural actives and omitting these film-formers was thus formulated and tested for its repair capabilities.

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  • Striking K-pop hair styling and makeup trends are storming Indonesia's youth.
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The number of consumers with damaged hair continues to rise due to external factors; for example, mechanical damage from brushing, hair-straightening irons, etc.; chemical treatments such as hair dyeing and bleaching; and environmental damage from the sun, pollution, etc. Once hair is damaged, repair treatments must intervene on several levels to repair it—from the middle of the cortex to the cuticle. However, film-forming agents such as silicones, which are commonly used, cover the hair with a fine waterproof layer, slowing or even preventing the penetration of actives to repair hair. The present article therefore explores the development of a repair serum based on natural actives and omitting such film-formers.

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This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Figure 1. Schematic of the structure of hair

Figure 1. Schematic of the structure of hair

Figure 2. Hair No. 1, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 2. Hair No. 1, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 3. Hair No. 2, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 3. Hair No. 2, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 4. Hair No. 3, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 4. Hair No. 3, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 5. Hair No. 4, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 5. Hair No. 4, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 6. Hair No. 5, a) untreated and b) treated

Figure 6. Hair No. 5, a) untreated and b) treated

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