Tech Edge: Peptides, Amino Acids and Proteins in Skin Care?

Sep 28, 2007 | Contact Author | By: Mindy Goldstein, PhD, Estee Lauder; Karl Linter, PhD, Croda/Sederma
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Tech Edge: Peptides, Amino Acids and Proteins in Skin Care?
  • Article

From the column editor: The use of peptides with specific functions has increased significantly in personal care products. One is hard-pressed to find a formula on the shelf that does not list a polypeptide in the ingredient list. How are these peptides made? Where do the sequences originate? This month, I welcome Karl Lintner, PhD, from Sederma/Croda to present basic information on the peptides used in skin care products. Karl Lintner, PhD, is presently a technical advisor to Sederma and Croda Enterprise Technology. He received his degree in chemical engineering and his doctorate degree in biochemistry from Vienna University. From 1973 to 1983, he conducted research in biological peptides at the Nuclear Research Centre in Saclay, France, resulting in the publication of more than 30 papers in biochemistry and biophysics—essentially on peptide activity. From 1983 to 1989, Lintner was laboratory manager, then marketing manager for product development and worldwide technical support with the Henkel Company, Düsseldorf, Germany. In 1990, he joined Sederma as technical director. During his time in this position, he introduced peptides, synthetic ceramides and the first biotech products as cosmetic ingredients and received numerous patents. From 1997 to the present, Lintner has been managing director of Sederma.

—Mindy Goldstein, PhD 

It is difficult today to find a cosmetic or personal care brand that does not claim that at least some of its SKUs contain one or more peptides in their formulas. The concept of using active peptides in skin and hair care was slow to catch on but has gained considerable momentum over the last five years in all branches of the industry. It would thus be useful to clarify some of the concepts, ingredients and claims in connection with peptides in cosmetics. The relationship of peptides to amino acids and proteins, as indicated by the curious and specifically chosen title of this column, will become evident throughout this explanation.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article that appeared in the October 2007 issue of Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine. If you would like a copy of the complete article, please contact us at customerservice@cosmeticsandtoiletries.com.