Anatomy of Foot Care Formulas

Jul 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Luigi Rigano, PhD, Institute of Skin and Product Evaluation (ISPE)
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Title: Anatomy of Foot Care Formulas
emulsionsx drynessx excessive sweatx tired footx anti-callusx
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Years of wear and tear can be hard on the skin of the feet, as it is the continuous point of contact between human mass and the earth’s surface. This part of the body is frequently neglected while small, progressive and imperceptive damage accumulates in its structure. The consumer typically does nothing about foot damage until there is evidence and a cosmetic, and in some cases medical, need.

Many dermatological diseases such as athlete’s foot occur because the feet spend long spans of time in a warm, dark and humid environment, i.e., the shoe, which is ideal for the formation of the fungus. Fungal and bacterial proliferation can cause dry skin, redness, blisters, itching and peeling to occur. While there are several foot diseases related to diabetes, including gout, poor blood circulation or improperly trimmed toenails, this column will focus on the development of foot care formulae designed for cosmetic treatments.

Skin of the Feet

The skin of the feet has a structure and function similar to skin in other body areas, with some important differences. The skin on the foot is thicker than on the rest of the body; as it adsorbs the stress and strain of an upright stance, the most external layer of the epidermis on the sole hardens early in life and may reach 5 mm in thickness, which is 20 times thicker than in most other areas on the body. With this type of heavily compressed structure, it is evident that the skin of the feet, specifically the sole, requires targeted products with higher concentrations of water binders in comparison to other cosmetics.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Biography: Luigi Rigano, PhD, Studio Rigano Industrial Consulting Laboratories

Luigi Rigano, PhD, is a consultant for the cosmetics industry, co-director of the Institute of Skin and Product Evaluation (ISPE), and head of Studio Rigano Industrial Consulting Laboratories, a laboratory he founded in 1986. He spent more than 15 years in R&D, production and technical positions at Unilever, Intercos, Givaudan and Schering-Plough Corp., and is an active member of the International Federation of Societies of Cosmetic Chemists (IFSCC) and of the register of chemists in the Lombardia region of Italy. Rigano serves as a consultant at the Milan Court and has authored more than 80 scientific articles on cosmetics, aesthetics and dermatology.

Formula 1. Emulsion with 30% urea

Formula 1. Emulsion with 30% urea

Isocetyl Acohol 4.00% w/w
PPG-15 Stearyl Ether 2.00
Hydrogenated Polydecene 4.00
Salicylic Acid 1.00
Cetyl PEG/PPG-10/1 Dimethicone 2.50
Cyclopentasiloxane 8.00
Water (aqua) qs to 100.00
Allantoin 0.10
Magnesium sulfate 0.70
Glycerin 2.00
Sorbeth-30 2.00
Urea 30.00
Lactic Acid 1.00
Arginine 1.00

viscosity - Brookfield RVT - Helipath Stand T-C - 25°C @ 2,5 rpm, 140.000 mPas; @ 5,0 rpm 75.000 mPas)

Formula 2. Refreshing bath salts

Formula 2. Refreshing bath salts

Sodium Bicarbonate 25.00% w/w
Anhydrous Sodium Sulphate 23.00
Urea 10.00
Rice Starch 25.00
Ricinoleamido Sulfosuccinate 10.00
Butcher’s Broom Dry Extract 2.00
Horse Chestnut Dry Extract 2.00
Allantoin 1.00
Fragrance (parfum) 0.50
Menthyl Lactate 0.50
Hydrophilic Fumed Silica 1.00
  100.00

 

 

Formula 3. Anti-callus emulsion

Formula 3. Anti-callus emulsion

 Water (aqua)  qs to 100.00% w/w
 Disodium EDTA  0.10
 Betaine  1.50
 Glycerin  5.00
 Carbomer  0.25
 Dicaprylyl Ether  2.50
 2 Octyl Dodecanol  2.00
 PPG-15 Stearyl Ether  2.00
 Steareth-21  1.00
 Salicylic Acid  1.00
 Triclosan  0.50
 Lecithin  1.00
 Urea  5.00
 Lactic Acid  0.50
 Arginine  2.00
 Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate  1.00
 Lysine PCA  0.50

 

 

Formula 4. Fitness foot cream

Formula 4. Fitness foot cream

 Water (aqua)  qs to 100.00% w/w
 Glycerol  3.00
  Sodium Phytate  0.05
p-Anisic Acid  0.30
  Xanthan gum  0.30
Galactoarabinan  0.20
 Cetearyl alcohol (and) Glyceryl Stearate Citrate  2.00
 Glyceryl Caprylate  8.00
 Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil  3.00
 Beeswax (Cera Alba)  1.00
 Cupuacu Butter  2.00
Passion Fruit Oil  2.00
Isoamyl Laurate  3.00
Triethyl citrate  3.00
Tocopherol  0.20
 Menthyl Lactate  0.30
 Citric acid  qs

 

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