Recent Advances in Slimming Treatments

Apr 1, 2007 | Contact Author | By: Karen A Costa-Strachan, PhD, Prestige Brands Holdings Inc.
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Recent Advances in Slimming Treatments
microcirculationx connective tissuex adipose tissuex xanthinesx mesotherapyx
  • Article
  • Keywords/Abstract

Keywords: microcirculation | connective tissue | adipose tissue | xanthines | mesotherapy

Abstract: Slimming treatments address a number of targets in skin physiology, including: improving microcirculation, strengthening and protecting the connective tissue, and decreasing adipocyte contents. Traditional and newer approaches to slimming treatments employ a number of ingredients to achieve such ends.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Popular sites for body contouring include the hips, thighs, buttocks and abdomen. One reason for this is that the hips, thighs and buttocks are areas particularly prone to cellulite. Cellulite is a term used to define the puckered, dimpled or “orange-peel” like appearance of the skin often seen in these areas of the body. Cellulite typically begins to develop during or after puberty, so it is thought that estrogen plays a role in its development.

Cellulite can manifest in women of all ages, races and body weight. Although weight gain can worsen the appearance of cellulite, it is noteworthy that even slender women can suffer from the appearance of cellulite. Thus, it is not surprising that the hips, thighs and buttocks are sites that are also popular targets for slimming treatment products.

Skin Structure Considerations

The outer layer of the skin reflects activity beneath its surface, especially when there are structural changes occurring. Therefore, to best understand how to target slimming formulations to these areas, it is worthwhile to understand a bit more about the underlying anatomy. 

The skin is composed of the epidermis and the dermis. Underlying the dermis is the hypodermis or subcutaneous fat layer. The subcutaneous fat layer can be thought of as being composed of two sub-layers. These two sub-layers include the deeper localized fat deposits and the more superficial compartmentalized layer of fat.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!