Addressing Tooth Sensitivity and Dental Erosion

May 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Robert V. Faller, Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, USA
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Addressing Tooth Sensitivity and Dental Erosion
dental erosionx anticariesx sensitivityx fluoridex tooth longevityx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: dental erosion | anticaries | sensitivity | fluoride | tooth longevity

Abstract: While the introduction of fluoride remarkably increased the life expectancy of natural teeth, two oral care problems have since emerged: tooth sensitivity and dental erosion. This article describes approaches to these problems and discusses the challenge of simultaneously maintaining fluoride efficacy in multi-benefit toothpaste formulations.

View citation for this article

RV Faller, Addressing tooth sensitivity and dental erosion, Cosm & Toil 127(5) 362-371 (May 2012)

Market Data

  • In oral care, health concerns are the number one driver of sales.
  • Consumers are also looking to whiten teeth and freshen breath.
  • Products that provide multiple benefits are proving to be the most attractive.
  • Marketers have had success with "product suites," i.e., groupings of products presented as a complete oral care package.
view full article

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Pivotal research from the late 1950s continues to impact oral care technology development today. At that time, researchers at Indiana University successfully demonstrated the ability of fluoride to be incorporated into toothpaste and deliver an anticavity, or anticaries, benefit. The first toothpaste proven to be clinically effective against caries was the original Crest brand toothpaste, a product formulated with stannous fluoride (SnF2) in an abrasive system that was only partially compatible with the fluoride active. Earlier toothpastes had combined ionic sodium fluoride, a highly reactive species, with calcium-based abrasives such as calcium carbonate. The active anticaries agent, the F- ion, reacted with free calcium in these formulations, forming insoluble calcium flouride, which produced clinically ineffective products.

While the introduction of fluoride remarkably increased the life expectancy of natural teeth, two oral care problems have since emerged: tooth sensitivity and dental erosion. This article describes approaches to these problems and discusses the challenge of simultaneously maintaining fluoride efficacy in multi-benefit toothpaste formulations.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This is an excerpt of an article from GCI Magazine. The full version can be found here.

 

Close

Table 1. Cavity formation, dental erosion and tooth sensitivity processes

Table 1. Cavity formation, dental erosion and tooth sensitivity processes

While anticavity toothpastes are designed to protect teeth against the progression of cavities, tooth sensitivity and dental erosion are the result of completely different processes that occur on exposed tooth surfaces.

Table 2. Precipitation technologies designed to deliver sensitivity benefits

Table 2. Precipitation technologies designed to deliver sensitivity benefits

Precipitation technologies are an alternate formulation approach toward reducing tooth sensitivity. This approach aims to occlude the open, exposed dentinal tubules with mineral precipitates capable of withstanding acid and abrasive challenges.

Figure 1. Fluoride salts commonly used in toothpaste

Figure 1. Fluoride salts commonly used in toothpaste

Today, the vast majority of toothpastes sold globally are formulated with sodium fluoride, amine fluoride, SMFP or stannous fluoride.

Figure 2. Stannous fluoride approach for dentinal tubuli blockage and sensitivity efficacy

Figure 2. Stannous fluoride approach for dentinal tubuli blockage and sensitivity efficacy

Stannous fluoride (SnF2)—rapid deposition for dentinal tubuli blockage and sensitivity efficacy; upper left: Cross-sectional view of dentinal tubules during treatment; upper right: Cross-sectional view, occluded tubule; bottom left: Surface view, open dentinal tubules; bottom right: Surface view, post treatment with SnF2 toothpaste

Figure 3. Slabs of treated human enamel

Figure 3. Slabs of treated human enamel

Slabs of human enamel treated with a) SnF2 or b) sodium fluoride (NaF), followed by erosive acid challenges. Areas to the left and right of center “trough” treatment areas were protected during erosive challenges and serve as reference control areas. Images c) and d) are cross-sectional microradiographs of thin sections removed from treated enamel specimens, through the area of treatment and acid challenge, showing clear differences in protection provided by SnF2 compared to NaF toothpaste treatment. Note the minimal amount of tooth surface loss in images a) and c), compared to b) and d).

Figure 4. Stannous fluoride vs. fluoride

Figure 4. Stannous fluoride vs. fluoride

Stannous fluoride protects better against dietary acid erosion than other fluoride systems. Adapted from Reference 16.

Footnotes [Faller 127(5)]

a Crest is a registered trademark of Procter & Gamble Co.

b Recaldent is a product of Cadbury Enterprises Pte., Ltd.

c NovaMin is a product of NovaMin Technology.

d Pro-Argin is a product of Colgate-Palmolive Co.

e Apagard is a product of Sangi Co., Ltd.

f BioRepair is a product of Coswell S.p.A.

g Sensodyne is a product of GlaxoSmithKline.

h Pro-Health is a product of Procter & Gamble Co.

Next image >