C&T With Honey

Sep 29, 2009 | Contact Author | By: Rachel Grabenhofer, Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine
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Title: C&T With Honey
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Wellness is not a new concept; such practices as yoga and meditation have espoused its virtues for centuries. However, only more recently has mainstream society gained an appreciation for wellness, as evidenced by the explosion of spa-type products and health conscious food choices on the market. Perhaps our busy lifestyles are finally catching up with us.

Wellness is somewhat ambiguous since it relates to everything aimed at achieving good physical, mental and even spiritual health. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary refers1 to it as the state of being in good health especially as an actively sought goal. I became better acquainted with this definition recently, when seasonal allergies and cooler weather ganged up to cause me plenty of unwellness. I actively sought good—or at least better—health and interestingly, my physician prescribed an antibiotic and hot tea with honey (the irony of “modern” medicine).

In personal care, wellness is achieved primarily through the physical health of hair and skin, as well as through mental health, which is strengthened by an individual’s positive self image. In relation to these areas, this issue of Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine examines two topics relevant to the state of wellness—skin health and aging.

Relating to skin health, Arnold et al.’s article investigates the metabolism of vitamin D in skin and how it relates to skin barrier function, the activation of antimicrobial peptides, the photoprotection of skin and protection against cell death. The author further examines these benefits for skin care applications. Also, Knaggs looks at a recently discovered factor involved in intrinsic aging: the arNOX enzyme. Here, the author discusses mechanisms through which the enzyme operates and its relation to the appearance of aging in skin, suggesting it could be a new target for antiaging formulations.

Finally, natural or nature-friendly products also fall into the wellness area since their purchase imparts a “do-good” feeling in consumers; Abrutyn’s column describes how to build such products. And this edition of C&T magazine would not be complete without the annual Testing Directory.

This issue takes wellness cosmetics to heart. Steep some hot tea with honey, sit back, relax and enjoy an interesting read—it’s good for you, and will surely provide you healthy food for thought. I know I feel better.

References 1. www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wellness