Advances in Hair Styling*

May 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Raymond Rigoletto; Anand Mahadeshwar, PhD; Linda Foltis; and David Streuli, Ashland Specialty Ingredients, Wayne, NJ, USA
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Title: Advances in Hair Styling*
resinx polymerx VOCx hair fiberx evaluationx
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Keywords: resin | polymer | VOC | hair fiber | evaluation

Abstract: All hair styling formulations start with a framework that is adjusted to obtain the correct viscosity, flow, etc. Auxiliary ingredients are then added to fine-tune the formula with respect to aesthetics, benefits and compliance. This article presents a review of the components in hair styling products.

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R Rigoletto, A Mahadeshwar, L Foltis and D Streuli, Advances in hair styling, Cosm & Toil 127(5) 372-382 (May 2012)

Market Data

  • Consumers are looking toward hair for anti-aging benefits.
  • Anti-aging hair care products address concerns such as thinning, coloring, breakage and drying, with emphasis on particular ingredients that target specific hair issues.
  • Although trends in anti-aging hair care are currently focused primarily in North America and Europe, hair care brands are seeing opportunities globally, including emerging markets.
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Styling products take on a myriad of forms. One level of differentiation is whether they are applied to hair as a thickened liquid or a spray. With aerosols, the product is atomized either mechanically using specialized pumps or with pressurized liquefied propellant gases such as propane. Other products include clear to translucent gels, cream gels, low viscosity lotions, pomades, taffies, stringing pomades, light-airy soufflés and clays and waxes.

All hair styling formulations start with a framework that is adjusted to obtain the correct viscosity, flow, etc. Auxiliary ingredients are then added to fine-tune the formula with respect to aesthetics, benefits and compliance. This article presents a review of the components in hair styling products.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This is an excerpt of an article from GCI Magazine. The full version can be found here.

 

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Table 1. Structure-function relation of an advanced styling polymer

Table 1. Structure-function relation of an advanced styling polymer

An advanced styling polymer derived from VP homopolymer is the tetrapolymer polyquaternium-69; the structure-function relationships of the components are listed here.

Table 2. Effect of copolymerization on important hair attributes

Table 2. Effect of copolymerization on important hair attributes

Shown here is how the derivatization of VP adds important hair attributes that the VP polymer cannot achieve alone; besides film stiffness, the tetrapolymer provides stiffness under mechanical stress or durability of stiffness, high humidity curl retention, and reduction in flaking, to name a few.

Table 3. Current CARB VOC regulation for hair care products

Table 3. Current CARB VOC regulation for hair care products

The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has been aggressive in reducing the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in hair styling products since 1993.

Figure 1. Polyquaternium-69

Figure 1. Polyquaternium-69

This schematic is of an advanced styling polymer derived from VP homopolymer: the tetrapolymer polyquaternium-69.

Figure 2. Structure of VP/Acrylates/Lauryl Methacrylate Copolymer

Figure 2. Structure of VP/Acrylates/Lauryl Methacrylate Copolymer

An approach to making a VP type polymer more hydrophobic is copolymerizing with hydrophobically modified acrylates (AA), as is evident in VP/acrylates/lauryl methacrylate copolymer, shown here.

Figure 3. Structure of VP/Methacrylamide/Vinyl Imidazole Copolymer

Figure 3. Structure of VP/Methacrylamide/Vinyl Imidazole Copolymer

VP/methacrylamide/vinyl imidazole copolymer, shown here, is reported to have good setting properties under high humidity conditions and low tack, yet still preserves clarity in polyacrylate type thickeners.

Figure 4. Examples of stress-strain curves

Figure 4. Examples of stress-strain curves

Examples of stress-strain curves produced on a texture analyzer illustrating performance attributes; a) a brittle polymer and b) an elastic polymer

Figure 5. Styling product development evaluation process

Figure 5. Styling product development evaluation process

Evaluation techniques used in the product development process are outlinedhere; this is meant to provide a cross-section of the typical test methods employed without dwelling on details of test methodology.

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