Delivering High Moisturization from Lipstick

Oct 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Cicely Sara Quintana Seguil, Belcorp
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Title: Delivering High Moisturization from Lipstick
lipstickx moisturizingx bloomingx encapsulationx corneometerx
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Keywords: lipstick | moisturizing | blooming | encapsulation | corneometer

Abstract: To improve the appearance of dry and wrinkled lips, it is necessary to hydrate them. Here, the author describes a lipstick concept to meet this need and a formulation process to achieve it. The product was then tested for immediate and long-lasting moisturization using a corneometer, and a quantitative study was conducted to rate its usability.

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CS Quintana Seguil, Delivering High Moisturization from Lipstick, Cosm & Toil 128(10) 736 (2013)

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Lips are perhaps the most sensual part of the face and play a major role in perceived beauty. They are also in constant motion and exposed to physical and chemical changes that alter and impact their normal form, as evidenced by wrinkles and dryness. The histology of the lips is well-described, and the vermilion area where the lips end and facial skin begins is covered by a thin stratum corneum made up of orthokeratotic cells that have a shorter turnover rate than the normal stratum corneum.

Unlike other skin, the lips lack epidermis, and with a thickness of just three to five cellular layers, they are very thin compared with typical facial skin, which has up to 16 layers. Lighter colored lip skin also contains fewer melanocytes, which protect lips and impart color—as do blood vessels, as they appear through the thin lip skin. Further, the lip skin is not hairy and does not have sweat glands, therefore it does not have the usual protective layer of sweat or body oil to keep the skin smooth, inhibit pathogens or regulate warmth. For these reasons, the lips dry out faster than other skin and become chapped more easily. Preliminary studies have shown that lips lose five times more water than body skin.

To improve the appearance of dry and wrinkled lips, it is therefore necessary to hydrate them with emollients and moisturizers—and a lipstick designed to highlight the beauty and color of lips as well as moisturize them meets both fashion and function needs. To this end, several ideas were considered before the author began work on a final product concept; this process is described here. The resulting lipstick was then tested for immediate and long-lasting moisturization using a corneometer, and a quantitative study was conducted with female users to rate the usability of the lipstick.

Formulation Concept

As noted, a lipstick concept was envisaged to provide high levels of hydration to the lips. Moisturization can be accomplished by occlusion, i.e., preventing water loss by coating the skin to trap moisture in—essentially, replicating what a healthy sebum balance already does. This approach is common among many brands, and staple ingredients include petroleum, mineral oil and lanolin.

Thus, previous attempts were made by the author to improve the moisture efficacy of traditional lipsticks (data not shown) by incorporating ceramides; oil components; products with beeswax, shea butter and vitamin E; or oils such as jojoba, olive and coconut. These provided lips with adequate moisture via occlusion. While these are somewhat effective, such products can also clog pores and cause contact irritation due to their oil content.

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Figure 1. Corneometer results indicate the test lipstick significantly increased moisture.

Figure 1. Corneometer results indicate the test lipstick significantly increased moisture.

The corneometer results shown in Figure 1 indicate the test lipstick significantly increased the moisture level of the semimucous lip area: immediately, where it showed up to 57.89% moisture improvement; at 5 hr, a 94.74% improvement; and at 24 hr, up to 150% improvement, over the control, i.e., lips without lipstick.

Figure 2. How do you rate the quality of lipstick Y?

Figure 2. How do you rate the quality of lipstick Y?

For the survey, several questions were posed, but only those related to moisturization are included here; survey results are shown in Figures 2-7.

Figure 3. How moisturized do your lips feel with lipstick Y?

Figure 3. How moisturized do your lips feel with lipstick Y?

For the survey, several questions were posed, but only those related to moisturization are included here; survey results are shown in Figures 2-7.

Figure 4. Did lipstick Y reduce the appearance of wrinkles in your lips?

Figure 4. Did lipstick Y reduce the appearance of wrinkles in your lips?

For the survey, several questions were posed, but only those related to moisturization are included here; survey results are shown in Figures 2-7.

Figure 5. Do you feel that lipstick Y provides long-lasting moisture?

Figure 5. Do you feel that lipstick Y provides long-lasting moisture?

For the survey, several questions were posed, but only those related to moisturization are included here; survey results are shown in Figures 2-7.

Figure 6. Did you feel a cooling (refreshing) effect when using lipstick Y?

Figure 6. Did you feel a cooling (refreshing) effect when using lipstick Y?

For the survey, several questions were posed, but only those related to moisturization are included here; survey results are shown in Figures 2-7.

Figure 7. If you replied yes to the cooling effect, do you feel this related to a moisturizing effect?

Figure 7. If you replied yes to the cooling effect, do you feel this related to a moisturizing effect?

For the survey, several questions were posed, but only those related to moisturization are included here; survey results are shown in Figures 2-7.

Footnotes (CT1310 Quintana)

a The Corneometer 825 is produced by Courage & Khazaka Electronic GmbH, www.courage-khazaka.de.
b MultiSal (INCI: Sodium Starch Octenylsuccinate (and) Tocopherol (and) Magnesium Chloride (and) Potassium Chloride (and) Sodium Chloride (and) Glycine Soya (Soybean) Oil (and) Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter (and) Silica (and) Water (aqua)) is a product of Salvona Technologies, www.salvona.com.

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