From Hydration to Cell Turnover: An Integral Approach to Antiaging

Mar 1, 2010 | Contact Author | By: Eric Dupont, PhD, and Juan Gomez, Immanence; Claude Léveillé, MD, and Diane Bilodeau, PhD
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Title: From Hydration to Cell Turnover: An Integral Approach to Antiaging
antiagingx activesx integrated approachx stabilityx testingx biological mechanismsx
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Keywords: antiaging | actives | integrated approach | stability | testing | biological mechanisms

Abstract: As the mechanisms of skin aging become better understood, their complexity commands a different approach for antiaging benefits—i.e., integrating multiple complementary actives into a single formulation. In the present article, the authors describe a comprehensive formula designed to effectively address sixteen different mechanisms of skin aging.

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E Dupont, J Gomez, C Léveillé and D Bilodeau, From hydration to cell turnover: An integral approach to antiaging, Cosm & Toil 125(3) 50-62 (Mar 2012)

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The speed at which information now travels has favored the advancement of science and technology like never before. This is true for all aspects of life, including personal care. The industry’s understanding of skin physiological processes has progressed in recent years, and with deeper knowledge more sophisticated cosmetic products have emerged.

Over the past 50 years, cosmetics have evolved from camouflage makeup to the combined health and beauty products that currently predominate the market. In addition, cosmetic products now contain actives that modulate defined physiological processes. The frontier between cosmetic actives and drugs is thinning. In fact, the industry has been flirting so much with pharmaceutical science that their union has been celebrated with a new word, cosmeceutical. What can be learned from this association?

The recent evolution of pharmacological care has initiated a trend toward the development of combination therapies that simultaneously use a variety of drugs to eliminate or control the biochemical causes of a disease. Examples include combinations of antibiotics for tuberculosis, antiretroviral drugs for HIV, or chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer. With the recognition that the body has redundant mechanisms to control any given function, it seems logical to correct a health problem by simultaneously targeting several pertinent mechanisms. This approach was the basis for fantastic improvement in the success rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is now successfully treated in about 80% of patients by the application of intensive combination chemotherapy regimens.

The same rationale could be applied to cosmetic care, particularly to antiaging cosmetic care. Throughout the human body, skin aging is a complex process that involves multiple mechanisms that clearly influence each other. A comprehensive integral antiaging approach is thus needed for sustained improvement of the skin. However, this comes with important challenges. An integral approach to skin care requires deep knowledge of the physiological basis for skin aging. It also involves the combination of multiple actives at sufficient concentrations and in a stable formula, a real formulating challenge. The final product also should be clinically efficient and safe—and despite all of this, affordable.

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Table 1. Actions on skin physiology of the selected actives in the test blend 1

Table 1. Table 1. Actions on skin physiology of the selected actives in the test blend 1

An antiwrinkle and firming formulation is described in this article, which combines a long list of actives to fight the signs of skin aging on multiple fronts. A list of the actives found in this serum and their respective effects on physiology are presented here.

Figure 1. Effect of the test serum on skin parameters

Figure 1. Effect of the test serum on skin parameters

Wrinkle reduction was measured under normal conditions of use by optical profilometry of silicone imprints of skin, taken on day 0, 7, 28 and 56, respectively, while skin hydration was assessed using corneometr.

Figure 2. Effect of the test serum on skin irritation

Figure 2. Effect of the test serum on skin irritation

The effect of the product was documented through photographs and dermatologist comments, as well as a self-assessment questionnaire, after 1, 2, 3 and 4.6 months of treatment, respectively, compared to the baseline.

Figure 3. Effect of the test serum on pockets and rings under the eyes

Figure 3. Effect of the test serum on pockets and rings under the eyes

Participants applied 1–2 g of the serum twice daily to the face, neck and the eye contour for a period ranging 2–3 months. The effect of the product was documented through photographs and dermatologist comments.

Integrated Ingredient Concentrate

Editor’s note: The complete INCI listing for the integrated ingredient concentrate described in this article is as follows.

Water (aqua)
Squalane
Glycerin
Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride
Dimethicone
Cyclomethicone
Phenyl Trimethicone
Polysilicone-11
Glycosaminoglycans
PEG-8/SMDI Copolymer
Palmitoyl Oligopeptide (and) Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide 7
Imperata Cylindrica (Luffa) Root Extract
PEG-6 Isostearate
Hesperetin Laurate
Hydrogenated Polyisobutene
Anemarrhena Asphodeloides Root Extract
Equisetum Arvense (Horsetail) Extract
Rumex Occidentalis Extract
Hyaluronic Acid
Sesamum Indicum (Sesame) Seed Oil
Ethylbisiminomethylguaiacol Manganese Chloride
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil
Tocopheryl Acetate
Alteromonas Ferment Extract
Caprylic/Capric/Succinic Triglyceride
Dipalmitoyl Hydroxyproline
Commiphora Myrrha (Myrrh) Extract
Retinol
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
Humulus Lupulus (Hops) Extract
Bisabolol
Creatine
Aluminum Benzoate
Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate
Disodium Distyrylbiphenyl Disulfonate
Aluminum Chloride (and) Sodium Carbomer
HDI/Trimethylol Hexyllactone Crosspolymer
Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltaurate/VP Copolymer
Fragrance (parfum)
Carbomer
Propylene Glycol
Polysorbate 20
Butylene Glycol
PEG-8
Polysorbate 40
Sodium Metabisulfite
1,2-Hexanediol Caprylyl Glycol
Disodium EDTA
CI 77019 (Mica)

Footnotes [Dupont 125(3)]

a Deep Wrinkles Integral Correction Concentrate—IDC (INCI: see Integrated Ingredient Concentrate sidebar) is a product of Immanence Integral Dermo Correction Inc.

b EUK134 (INCI: Ethylbisiminomethylguaiacol Manganese Chloride) is a product of Cayman Chemical.

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